Egypt's military production minister Mohamed El-Assar passes away    Fundamental differences over GERD persist: Egypt's irrigation ministry    Egypt's Defence Ministry renamed Ministry of War    Egypt's non-oil private sector sees in June slowest contraction under COVID-19    Disputed Nile dam talks continue for 4th day, but no deal yet    Egypt mobile prices increase 15% due to new NTRA fees, low imports    Film, pop stars line up for COVID-19 fundraising concert    ‘Gone with the Wind' makes HBO Max return with commentary on slavery    Egypt, Eritrea vow to ensure Horn of Africa stability    Egypt banks see EGP 62bn increase in local currency deposits in May    Egypt's Red Sea resorts received 3,000 tourists over the past week    Van Damme mourns death of iconic Egyptian actress Ragaa El-Giddawy    Broadway veteran Nick Cordero dies from virus complications    US tops 130,000 deaths from COVID-19 after record surge in cases    Oscar-winning Italian composer Ennio Morricone dead at 91    LFF 2020 offers hybrid format adapting to COVID-19 challenges    Opinion| Rapists, TikTok Girls, and the State of Law    Opinion| How socially-led innovation can bring positive change in unchartered times    Egypt looking to ban importing products with local alternatives    China's Inner Mongolia takes precautions after detecting bubonic plague case    China begins pulling back troops near site of India border clash, Indian sources say    India overtakes Russia, now 3rd in virus cases    Egypt's Alexandria Company for Pharmaceuticals to launch new lines of disinfectants    Messi will finish career at Barcelona, says club president    Liverpool not focused on records, says coach Klopp    Guardiola at a loss to explain Manchester City defeats    Africa starts opening airspace even as COVID-19 cases climb    Israel announces successful launch of new spy satellite    Egypt receives first $2 billion tranche of IMF standby loan: minister    Egypt sees highest daily COVID-19 recoveries, fewer infections, deaths    Egypt's Sisi revises western border security plans    No consensus yet in Ethiopia's disputed dam ‘separate talks'    Canada should focus on boosting the economy even as debt climbs -analysts    Trump repeats vow to defeat 'radical left' in 4 July speech    TikTok distances from Beijing in responce to India app ban    Iconic actress Ragaa El-Gedawy passes away at 81 from COVID-19    Boris Johnson likely to start phasing out Huawei's 5G role soon    Egypt records 1,324 new coronavirus cases on Saturday – health ministry    UAE adopts new government structure, full announcement to come on Sunday    Egypt reopens 5 museums, 8 archaeological sites and operates 171 international, domestic flights    Egypt's Zamalek to continue training Thursday, but domestic league participation unclear    Federation of Egyptian Banks denies funding GERD: eletreby    Saudi development authority starts executing phase I of giant cultural project    11 coronavirus cases detected at Egyptian Premier League clubs – EFA    Egypt to host World Handball Championship on time despite COVID-19: EHF President    Liverpool's Egyptian winger Salah fit for Crystal Palace clash – coach Klopp    Egypt's parliament Oks amendments to House law amid differences over election    CAF draws timeline for resumed continental championships amid COVID-19    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.





New report alleges killings, mass detentions in Ethiopia
Published in Ahram Online on 29 - 05 - 2020

A new report by the rights group Amnesty International accuses Ethiopia's security forces of extrajudicial killings and mass detentions even as the country's reformist prime minister was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
The report issued Friday says security forces killed at least 25 people in 2019 in the East Guji and West Guji zones of the restive Oromia region amid suspicions of supporting a rebel group, the Oromo Liberation Army, and a once-exiled opposition group. And at least 10,000 people under suspicion were detained between January and September, with most ``subjected to brutal beatings.``
The government of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, who was awarded the peace prize in December for sweeping political reforms and restoring ties with neighboring Eritrea after two decades of hostilities, did not comment on the report, which comes amid concerns that some repressive measures have returned.
Tensions among some of Ethiopia's more than 80 ethnic groups have risen, along with some calls for more autonomy, and the new report also documents some of the intercommunal violence in the Oromia and Amhara regions, the country's most populous.
Such violence is a concern as the country faces a crucial national election, now delayed because of the coronavirus, that will be a measure of support for the country's changes since Abiy took office in early 2018.
With no election date set and mandates for the executive and regional and federal legislatures ending in October, political parties are disagreeing on strategies for how to avoid a potential constitutional crisis.
Amnesty acknowledged that Ethiopian authorities have made notable progress in changing the country's bleak human rights record. But ``with elections on the horizon, these violations and abuses could escalate out of control unless the government takes urgent measures to ensure security forces act within the law,'' said Deprose Muchena, the group's director for East and Southern Africa, adding that ``authorities must also recognize that holding diverse political views and opinions is legal.''
The new report blames a range of actors for the violence during 2019 including regional police special forces, local administration officials and armed youth and vigilante groups. The rights group noted that in the new, wider political space some politicians have been ``stirring up ethnic and religious animosities,'' sparking violence in five of the country's nine regional states.
``The research finds a horrendously botched security operation at work in Amhara and Oromia regions characterized by impunity that is difficult to imagine in present-day Ethiopia,'' Amnesty said. Former detainees told the rights group about multiple cases of arbitrary arrest and detention of family members, including children, when security officials couldn't find the person they sought to arrest.
In the Oromia region, the government in January 2019 launched a law enforcement offensive against the Oromo Liberation Army, which had staged armed attacks in the region. The armed group broke away from the political wing of the once-exiled Oromo Liberation Front, which under Ethiopia's reforms returned to the country to pursue a peaceful political agenda.
In the Amhara region, ``at least 150 people were killed in inter-communal conflict in which the security forces were complicit,'' the report said, noting that at least 58 ethnic Qimant, who seek more autonomy, were killed within 24 hours in January 2019. ``The attacks and counter-attacks led to internal displacement of thousands of ethnic Amhara and Qimant people.''
The deputy head of the Amhara Regional Peace and Security Bureau told the rights group that more deaths could have occurred if the security forces had not been deployed and rejected the claim that security forces were complicit in some of the attacks.
Several other government offices did not respond to the report, Amnesty said.
Two opposition groups reacted to the new report with further allegations.
``The report covers the period up to the end of 2019. However, the situation in the Oromia region specifically has gotten progressively worse in 2020 with a substantial rise in mass incarcerations, extrajudicial killings and destruction of property in provinces that were not previously affected,'' said a joint statement issued by the Oromo Liberation Front and Oromo Federalist Congress.
``The report is further proof that the new administration has not parted ways with the practice of forcefully stifling dissent.''


Clic here to read the story from its source.