Trump, EU chief to meet in Davos as US tariffs loom over digital tax: Sources    Egypt's tycoon Nassef Sawiris is Africa's second richest person    Europe stocks in green as China's GDP grows as expected; Stoxx 600 hit records high    Floods, road closures in Australia as storms lash some bushfire-hit regions    Gargash: UAE unreservedly supports Germany efforts to bring peace in Libya    Live score: Brighton & Hove Albion v Aston Villa (English Premier League)    Inter Milan sign wing-back Ashley Young from United    Bale, Ramos ruled out for Real Madrid's clash against Sevilla, Benzema returns    Egypt's expected to see 5.8% 2020 GDP growth: UN report    Al-Hariri condemns Al Hamra attacks, amid protesters smashing central bank    Sudanese army regains control, opens airspace    France, US request to join East Mediterranean Gas Forum    Egypt's interior ministry says Mostafa Kassem received fair trial, was convicted terrorist    Three Egyptians on Forbes Africa's Billionaires' top 10 list    Ghosn lawyers rebut new Nissan claims against fugitive exec    China population now over 1.4 billion as birthrate falls    Art Alert: Bibliotheca Alexandrina to screen Oscar Shorts and star-studded films from Arab world    Screenwriter and producer Mohamed Hefzy's 'Ras El-Sana' to hit Egyptian cinemas in February    Egyptian actress Magda Al-Sabahi dies at 89    China, U.S. sign initial trade pact but doubts and tariffs linger    European shares edge higher after US-China trade deal    Egypt is best tourism destination for 2020 according to BBC    Washington meeting on GERD continues for third day    Egypt will not allow Anadolu's continuous ‘support of terrorism': senior official    Government launches Upper Egypt's first cultural festival    GERD filling will consider Blue Nile hydrological conditions, potential impact on downstream reservoirs: Egypt, Ethiopia, Sudan, US and WB    Egypt names executive head of comprehensive health insurance authority – ministry    New study finds Ocean acidification does not affect behaviour of coral reef fish    Nancy Ajram's husband charged with ‘intentional' murder    Trump, British PM Johnson agree on a ‘Trump deal' for Iran    6th of October Rotary club trains undergrads for teaching literacy workshops    BBC names Egypt as best tourism destination for 2020    Brain freeze: Russian firm offers path to immortality for a fee    WHO says new China coronavirus could spread, warns hospitals worldwide    Smooth mid-year    Ethiopian Dam talks to continue in Washington on Wednesday : Ministry    Inconclusive GERD negotiations    Mission Africa continues    Parliament approves three-month extension of state of emergency    Berlin Film Festival announces retrospective programme    NBE studies establishment of rowing club in Cairo    Egyptian sports in 2020: challenges and opportunities    Tough Mudder obstacle course race takes place for first time in Egypt    Egypt approves Uber's acquisition of Careem with set conditions    Egypt's Zamalek, Smouha presidents hit with disciplinary sanctions by EFA    Egypt's President Sisi pardons some prisoners on 25 Jan. Revolution anniversary    Egypt's Sami Anan released after near two-year detention    Liverpool's Mohamed Salah optimistic to see Egypt at 2022 World Cup    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.





Chocolate tied to decreased risk of irregular heart rhythm
Published in Ahram Online on 24 - 05 - 2017

Eating a small amount of chocolate every week or so may decrease the risk of a common and serious type of irregular heart rhythm, according to a new study of people in Denmark.
People who ate chocolate one to three times per month were about 10 percent less likely to be diagnosed with atrial fibrillation than those who ate the sweet treat less than once a month, researchers found.
"As part of a healthy diet, moderate intake of chocolate is a healthy snack choice," said lead author Elizabeth Mostofsky, of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.
The study cannot say for certain that it was the chocolate that prevented atrial fibrillation, however.
Mostofsky and colleagues write in the journal Heart that eating cocoa and cocoa-containing foods may help heart health because they have a high volume of flavanols, which are compounds that are believed to have anti-inflammatory, blood vessel-relaxing and anti-oxidant properties.
Past studies have that found eating chocolate - especially dark chocolate, which has more flavanols - is tied to better measures of heart health and decreased risk for certain conditions like heart attacks and heart failure, they add.
There isn't as much research on whether chocolate is also linked to a lower risk of atrial fibrillation, which occurs when the upper chamber of the heart beats irregularly.
For the new analysis, the researchers used data collected for a long-term study of 55,502 people in Denmark. The men and women were between 50 and 64 years old when it began, and they provided information about their diets when they entered the study between 1993 and 1997.
The researchers then linked that diet data to Denmark's national health registries to see who was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation.
Overall, about 3,346 cases of atrial fibrillation occurred over an average of 13.5 years.
Based on their diets at the beginning of the study period, people who ate one serving, about 1 ounce (28.35 grams), of chocolate per week were 17 percent less likely to be diagnosed with atrial fibrillation by the end of the study than people who reported eating chocolate less than once a month.
Similarly, those who ate 2 to 6 ounces per week were 20 percent less likely to be diagnosed with atrial fibrillation while those who ate more than an ounce of chocolate a day were 16 percent less likely to have the condition.
Among women, the biggest risk reduction was tied to eating one serving of chocolate per week. For men, the biggest reduction came with eating two to six servings per week.
"I think our message here is that moderate chocolate intake as part of a healthy diet is an option," Mostofsky told Reuters Health.
The researchers caution that they can't account for unmeasured factors, such as kidney disease and sleep apnea, that may influence the risk of atrial fibrillation. They also didn't have data on the type of chocolate or the amount of flavanols participants ate. Their diets may have also changed over the nearly 14 years of data collection.
The data also suggests the participants who ate the most chocolate consumed more calories but had a lower body mass index - a measure of weight in relation to height - than people who ate the least chocolate, noted Alice Lichtenstein, director and senior scientist at the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at Tufts University in Boston.
"It's very likely - if I had to bet - that these people were more physically active," said Lichtenstein, who was not involved in the new study.
She said people likely can't get around the fact that they need to have a healthy diet, be physically active and not smoke to optimize their health.
"There is no quick fix," she told Reuters Health.
Drs. Sean Pokorney and Jonathan Piccini write in an accompanying editorial that the study's findings are interesting and warrant further consideration despite their limitations.
"A double-blind randomized controlled trial is needed to evaluate the true efficacy of chocolate for the prevention of (atrial fibrillation) and such a trial would need to incorporate quantified doses of cocoa," write Pokorney and Piccini, of Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina.


Clic here to read the story from its source.