US President Trump urges Libya de-escalation on call with Erdogan: White House    PM Boris Johnson risks party wrath to back aide who crossed UK amid coronavirus    Americans soak up sun on beaches as COVID-19 death toll nears 100k    Egypt records 752 new coronavirus cases on Sunday    Mental health apps draw wave of new users as experts call for oversight    Zuckerberg led Facebook to an all-time high this week    Egypt produces 7.2 bcf per day of natural gas – Cabinet    Reportage Properties unveils $71 mln in UAE sales in four months    Sisi congratulates Egyptians on occasion of Eid Al-Fitr    No fans and no protesters as Leipzig beats Mainz in Bundesliga    China legislation on Hong Kong could lead to US sanctions: White House    Bournemouth player tests positive for COVID-19    Afghan Taliban declare three-day Eid ceasefire from Sunday    Public returns to St. Peter's Square; pope calls for defence of environment    Jerusalem's Holy Sepulcher reopens after coronavirus closure    Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Fitr holiday amid curfews, virus fears    Netanyahu heads to court as 1st sitting Israeli PM on trial    Lyon president calls French League's halt to Ligue 1 'stupid'    Egypt's Sisi congratulates Egyptians on the occasion of Eid El-Fitr    Egypt's interior ministry gives gifts to families of policemen killed or injured in the line of duty    Egypt producing 7.2 bcf per day of natural gas: Cabinet    Egyptian police kill 21 terrorists who plotted attacks on Eid El-Fitr    Egypt issues $5bn eurobonds, biggest global issuance in its history    UK to introduce quarantine for international arrivals from June 8    Egyptian sculpture pioneer Adam Henein dies at 91    New Edition of Stephen Covey's The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People    China defence spending rise at three-decade low, still to grow 6.6%    Italy's football federation sets August 20 as deadline for finishing season    Orchestra in masks: Ukrainian musicians in first concert recording as lockdown eases    Egypt's decision to resume sports activities breathes life into hopes to restart league    Egyptian Premier League final decision to be taken before May-end: minister    Egypt's 12 MPs came into contact with coronavirus infected parliamentarian    iRead launches new activities, competitions to pread the passion for reading    British Council in Egypt makes its digital library for free amid coronavirus    Sheikh Mahmoud El-Tablawy dies at 86    Kuwait breaks up riot by Egyptian workers seeking repatriation – ministry    Egypt, MENA growth forecast at 2.7%, -0.3% respectively: IIF    Prosecution warns of EGP 300k fine or 2-year jail for spreading fake coronavirus news    Al-Sisi discusses joint coronavirus efforts with Abu Dhabi Crown Prince    Saudi Arabia intercepts missiles over Riyadh    CBE temporarily regulates cash deposits, withdrawals    Lagging COVID-19 response to shield frail economy: Rouhani    Weekend's virtual concerts, plays, and festivals people can stream at home    Brazilian football stadiums transformed into hospitals to treat coronavirus patients    Amid coronavirus outbreak, Egyptian Premier League cancellation seems inevitable    Stay At Home: Ministry of Culture to publish free books online for public browsing    Ethiopia has not sent Egypt latest designs for GERD: Minister of Irrigation    Nigerien President hails Egypt's diplomatic attempts to reach agreement over GERD    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.





Syrians displaced in the northwest call on Turkey to open border
Published in Ahram Online on 22 - 05 - 2019

Camped on the Turkish border to escape bombardment by Russian and Syrian government forces, many displaced Syrians are angry and frustrated that Turkey has not done more to protect them from the bombs or let them cross the frontier to safety.
The border wall a few hundred metres (yards) away offers a degree of cover for thousands of people, since air strikes are rare so close to Turkey. But it also blocks any chance they have of fleeing the conflict and joining millions of refugees abroad.
"Turkey is our only option today," said Abu Abdallah, 51, who left his village at the start of the war in 2011 to seek sanctuary near the town of Qalaat al-Madiq, until it was captured by Syrian government forces in early May.
"We can no longer put up with living under bombardment or in the open under the trees," said Abu Abdullah, one of thousands of Syrians living in white tents dotted around the rock-strewn olive groves, some of them only 50 metres (yards) from the border.
Some 180,000 people were displaced by the recent attacks in northwest Syria, the last major rebel stronghold. The increase in shelling killed dozens of people and marked the most intense period of violence for months between President Bashar al-Assad and the rebels, who launched a counter-attack last week.
The Syrian government says it is responding to attacks by al Qaeda-linked militants. The dominant insurgent faction in the region is the jihadist Hayat Tahrir al-Sham (HTS), although the army offensive has not focused on the central Idlib area where it is most concentrated, an HTS-aligned opposition figure said.
Much of the bombardment has hit a buffer zone around Idlib province and surrounding territories which was set up by Russia and Turkey in September under a deal which put off a full-blown assault against the region and its 3 million residents.
Shells from Syrian government territory also hit a Turkish military observation post, one of 12 set up near the Idlib borders by Ankara, which backs the rebels.
At the border, many of the displaced were angry at the lack of Turkish action in response to the recent offensive, and called on Turkey to open its border to allow people to escape.
"We didn't ask to go into Turkey before," said 32-year-old Khsara Ahmed al-Hussein. "But when you set up a de-escalation zone and ... you guarantee that I won't get struck, but then even the Turkish observation point is struck by the regime, then what's the point of protection if you can't even protect yourself?".

Like world war three
When bombardment of Hussein's village intensified, his family dug holes in the earth outside their house and slept in them. When the situation became unbearable, they headed to the border, where he has been living under trees for two weeks.
"There were eight planes in the air, bombing intensively, as if it were World War Three," he said.
Air strikes have hit 18 health facilities and dozens of schools, according to the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). At least 38 children have been killed since the start of last month, Save the Children said.
Turkey's President Tayyip Erdogan said last week that attacks on schools and hospitals did not constitute fighting terrorism. His defence minister spoke with his Russian counterpart on Monday about reducing tension in Idlib, Turkey's defence ministry said.
Near the border village of Atmeh, dozens of people sat under trees with a few blankets and pillows arranged on the hard earth. A blue plastic tarp was draped over the trees to protect them from the burning sun.
Um Bassan wants to join her children who have been in Turkey for over a year, after she and their father spent everything they had to smuggle them out of Syria.
"I want this torture to end and to see my children," she said. "No one prefers another country over their own, but I want release from the bombardment and to see my children there."


Clic here to read the story from its source.