FIFA defends VAR ahead of women's World Cup quarter-finals    Egypt-Germany trade volume hits 4.5 bln euros in 2018: Cabinet    Opioid use booming as tramadol crisis emerges in Africa: UN drug report    Lebanon opposes U.S. plan for Middle East – Prime Minister Hariri    UAE says 'scientific, convincing evidence' needed regarding Gulf tanker attacks    Trump: any Iranian attack on Americans will be met with ‘obliteration'    Ukraine government sets price cap for heating tariffs    Interview: Egypt targets non-financial IMF deal by October – FinMin    U.S.-China trade deal is 90% complete – Mnuchin    Martens sends Netherlands through to maiden quarter-finals    China urges Britain to stop interfering in Hong Kong affairs    European stocks to open lower after Fed cools rate cut hopes    Asian markets fall as Fed's Powell tempers rate cut expectations    Benin fight back to draw with 10-man Ghana in Nations Cup opener    BREAKING: Terrorist Hisham El-Ashmawy being retried in five cases for supporting, carrying out attacks    Egypt PM, Germany's Siemens discuss boosting cooperation    UK's BlueMac signs MOU with Egypt on establishing waste management joint venture    'Everything is stolen from us': Tunisians fight to preserve cultural heritage    Sisi praises Egyptian fans' behaviour during 2019 AFCON opener    Egypt dazzles us with a breath taking AFCON 2019 opening    Egypt makes winning start to Africa Cup of Nations    Egypt calls for speeding up talks on Ethiopia's GERD dam    Mourning a dog can be harder than losing a relative or friend    Egypt says to launch hepatitis C medical examination initiative in Africa    China needs around $440 bln to clean up rural environment – People's Daily    Egypt slams Human Rights Watch director's tweets on Morsi's    Egypt trying to halt Tutankhamun statue sale in London    20 million drug tablets smuggling foiled in Damietta    Art Alert: Little Eagles to screen at KMT    New academic year to start 21 Sept: Egypt's Supreme Council of Universities    In Photos: Egyptian Museum in Tahrir inaugurates new path for the visually impaired    Playing victim    Morsi dies    A painless commute    United against corruption    Africa welcomed home    Food on Facebook    Beef olives with an Oriental twist    Tanker war puts pressure on Iran    Losing is not an option    Promoting football tourism    Al-Sisi in Eastern Europe    Singer Nesma Mahgoub at Cairo Opera House Summer Festival    Mervat Shazly showing at Salama art gallery    The mummies go to the NMEC    Muslim Brotherhood: Playing victim    Egypt FM spokesman condemns OHCHR statement on Morsi's death for 'lack of integrity and objectivity'    Saudi Arabia celebrates Eid al-Fitr with 13 Arab artists    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.





Tripoli government threatens to suspend foreign firms to pressure Europe
Published in Ahram Online on 09 - 05 - 2019

Libya's internationally recognized government asked 40 foreign firms including French oil major Total to renew their licenses or have their operations suspended, pressuring Europe to stop an eastern military offensive against Tripoli.
The firms have three months to renew their licenses, the economy and industry ministry said in a decree, after an official earlier said their operations had been suspended.
The ministry cited legal procedures, but the action comes as the Tripoli-based government seeks to drum up support to fend off an operation by Khalifa Haftar's Libya National Army (LNA), which has been trying for one month to take the capital.
Tripoli is home to the recognized administration but some European countries such as France have also supported eastern military commander Haftar as a way to fight militants in a country in chaos since the toppling of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011.
The decree was published a day after Tripoli prime minister Fayez al-Serraj met French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris, coming from Berlin and Rome, to bolster his case.
Macron had called for a ceasefire but with the condition attached that all armed groups — including those helping Serraj defend the capital — be monitored.
Haftar also would not have to withdraw his troops east, allowing him to book a huge territorial gain, which upset the Serraj government, said Jalel Harchaoui, research fellow at the Clingendael Institute in The Hague.
“Officially, those 40 licenses were scheduled to be expiring now,” he said. “In reality, the decree is motivated by a desire to show European states that their leniency towards the eastern-Libyan faction has immediate consequences on their economic interests.”
Total, with large-scale oil and gas interests in Libya, is the only company on the list known to have extensive dealings there. Others include French aerospace firm Thales, German engineering firm Siemens and telecoms equipment firm Alcatel-Lucent, now owned by Finland's Nokia.
Last month, the Tripoli-based interior ministry suspended security cooperation with France, accusing Paris of backing Haftar, a commander from the east of the country where a rival government holds sway.
Highlighting France's apparently complex position, the foreign minister of Haftar's eastern parallel government visited France, though it was not immediately clear whether any French officials had received him.
ROCKETS
In the capital Tripoli, three rockets hit a western suburb overnight close to the heavily fortified U.N. compound but otherwise there was less fighting than last week as life slowed down with the start of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.
The United Nations has failed to broker a ceasefire after the offensive took it by surprise. Its special envoy Ghassan Salame has mostly stayed on the ground but his mission has reduced staffing levels, U.N. officials say.
One senior health worker was severely wounded as he traveled in an ambulance car in a southern Tripoli district that was reportedly attacked by Haftar-affiliated fighters, the U.N. humanitarian agency OCHA said in a statement.
European countries including Italy and France have taken a strong interest in Libya, both because of its natural resources and because of its status as the main departure point for migrants attempting to enter Europe across the Mediterranean. European countries have backed Libyan efforts that have succeeded in reducing the numbers attempting the journey.
Two boats carrying 214 migrants were intercepted by the Libyan coast guard late on Wednesday and taken back to the shore, the U.N. migration agency said.
“As clashes continue in the capital, we are concerned about the return and arbitrary detention of migrants in #Libya,” the International Organization for Migration said in a tweet.
IOM spokesman Joel Millman said the 107 people on the first boat included 12 women and seven children, while the 107 people on the second boat were all men, 92 of them Sudanese, and there had been no reports of missing people or bodies retrieved.
In the south, three people were killed on Thursday in a suspected hit-and-run attack by Islamic State militants on the town of Ghadwa, residents and a military official said, the second such attack within days.
*This story was edited by Ahram Online.


Clic here to read the story from its source.