CBE receives 24 bids worth $1.15bn for T-bills tender denominated in US currency    Death toll in Indonesia's Semeru volcano eruption rises to 34, over 100 injured    Startups Without Borders to hold hybrid summit in Rome, Cairo    NTRA raises efficiency of mobile services in Sinai with EGP 513m investment    Economic recovery is essential in countering COVID-19 impact on Africa: Shoukry    Egypt advances to 21st in Climate Change Performance Index 2022    UNFPA, Canada delegation visits projects in Upper Egypt    Egypt, WHO discuss mechanisms to reduce antimicrobial resistance    Plastic Bank collects 150 million bottles in 2021, equivalent to 2,700 tonnes of plastic    US awards film residency programmes to Egyptian filmmakers at CIFF 2021    Irrigation Ministry highlights threats to Egypt's water security before Senate    DP World Sokhna: Integrated supply chain for Egyptian sugar    Egypt's PMI unchanged in Nov as higher inflation expectations weigh on: IHS    Egypt's LNG exports at full capacity of 1.6 bcf/d after gas price rise – minister    Indian Embassy in Cairo presents contemporary dance performances    Egypt explores water cooperation with 4 African countries    Al-Sisi visits Police Academy, witnesses admission exams    Soma Bay hosts Oceanman's Final World Championship 2021 for open-water swimming    Lebanese legend Fairuz is Egypt's most-streamed female singer on Spotify in 2021    Egypt, Qatar discuss cooperation in sports infrastructure    Mortada Mansour sets road map for Zamalek, after normalization committee depart    Egypt's trade with Nile basin countries climbs 26% y-o-y in 9 months    Egypt selected to host COP27 international climate conference in 2022    Number of British tourists to Egypt seen hitting 500,000 this winter – envoy    The unvaccinated prohibited from entry to Egypt state institutions starting December 1    Egypt, Greece ink deal for first subsea power link between Europe and Africa    SCOHRE sparks discussion on harm reduction, tobacco control    Egypt to receive first of six high-trains from Spain's Talgo in mid-November    Egypt's iron and steel exports jump 197% in 8 months    Ethiopia halts work at its embassy in Egypt for 'economic reasons'    It's a bit frustrating to draw at home: Real Madrid keeper after Villarreal game    Russia says it's in sync with US, China, Pakistan on Taliban    Shoukry reviews with Guterres Egypt's efforts to achieve SDGs, promote human rights    Sudan says countries must cooperate on vaccines    Johnson & Johnson: Second shot boosts antibodies and protection against COVID-19    Egypt to tax bloggers, YouTubers    Egypt's FM asserts importance of stability in Libya, holding elections as scheduled    Brazil calls up 8 EPL players for World Cup qualifying    We mustn't lose touch: Muller after Bayern win in Bundesliga    Egypt records 36 new deaths from Covid-19, highest since mid June    Egypt sells $3 bln US-dollar dominated eurobonds    Sisi calls on House, Senate to commence second legislative sessions on 3, 5 October    Gamal Hanafy's ceramic exhibition at Gezira Arts Centre is a must go    Italian Institute Director Davide Scalmani presents activities of the Cairo Institute for ITALIANA.IT platform    Qa'a play showing at Lycee El Horreya Theatre, Alexandria is a must go    APO Group enters new exclusive agreement with Getty Images on African press releases and images    On International Museum Day, Egypt opens two new museums at Cairo Airport    Old Cairo's Al-Fustat will be revamped on Egyptian President's directives    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.



Afghan women demand rights as Taliban seek recognition: AP report
Published in Ahram Online on 03 - 09 - 2021

A small group of Afghan women protested near the presidential palace in Kabul on Friday, demanding equal rights from the Taliban as Afghanistan's new rulers work on forming a government and seeking international recognition.
The Taliban captured most of the country in a matter of days last month and celebrated the departure of the last U.S. forces after 20 years of war. Now they face the urgent challenge of governing a war-ravaged country that is heavily reliant on international aid.
The Taliban have promised an inclusive government and a more moderate form of Islamic rule than when they last ruled the country from 1996 to 2001. But many Afghans, especially women, are deeply skeptical and fear a rollback of rights gained over the last two decades.
The protest in Kabul was the second women's protest in as many days, with the other held in the western city of Herat. Around 20 women with microphones gathered under the watchful eyes of Taliban gunmen, who allowed the demonstration to proceed.
The women demanded access to education, the right to return to work and a role in governing the country. ``Freedom is our motto. It makes us proud,'' read one of their signs.
A Taliban fighter ventured into the crowd at one point, but witnesses said he was angry at the bystanders who had stopped to watch the demonstration and not the protesters themselves.
The Taliban have said women will be able to continue their education and work outside the home, rights denied to women when the militants were last in power. But the Taliban have also vowed to impose Sharia, or Islamic law, without providing specifics.
Interpretations of Islamic law vary widely across the Muslim world, with more moderate strains predominating. The Taliban's earlier rule was shaped by Afghanistan's unique tribal traditions, under which women are not to be seen in public. Those customs endure, especially in the countryside, even during 20 years of Western-backed governments.
A potentially more pressing concern for the Taliban is the economy, which is mired in crisis. Civil servants haven't been paid for months, ATM's have been shut down and banks are limiting withdrawals to $200 per week, causing large crowds to form outside them. Aid groups have warned of widespread hunger amid a severe drought.
The Taliban said Western Union, which halted service after the militants entered Kabul last month, will resume transfers, which may help Afghans to receive cash from relatives living abroad. But most of Afghanistan's foreign reserves are held abroad and frozen while Western nations consider how to engage with the Taliban, putting pressure on the local currency.
There was no immediate comment from Western Union on the resumption of service.
The Taliban say they want good relations with all countries, even the United States, and have held a string of meetings with foreign envoys in recent days in the Gulf nation of Qatar, where they have long maintained a political office.
Western nations are expected to demand the Taliban live up to their promises to form an inclusive government and prevent Afghanistan from being a haven for terrorist groups. They may also press the Taliban on women's rights, though that could be a harder sell for the group's hard-line base, which is steeped in Afghanistan's deeply conservative, tribal culture.
Ahmadullah Muttaqi, a spokesman for the Taliban's cultural commission, said a senior official from the United Arab Emirates flew into Kabul's international airport on Friday to meet with Taliban officials, without naming him. Afghanistan's TOLO TV reported that the aircraft was also carrying 60 tons of food and medical aid.
Sher Mohammad Stanikzai, a senior Taliban official based in Qatar, recently met with British and German delegations, according to the Taliban, which said another official, Abdul Salam Hanafi, had a phone call with Chinese deputy foreign minister Wu Jianghao.
Most Western embassies were evacuated and shuttered in the days after the Taliban rolled into Kabul on Aug. 15. The Taliban have urged diplomats to return.
Taliban political leaders have gone on TV to say the world has nothing to fear from them. But many Afghans, as well as Western nations that spent two decades fighting the group, remain deeply skeptical.
Tens of thousands of Afghans fled the country after the Taliban takeover in a massive U.S.-led airlift out of Kabul international airport. The scenes of chaos, from Afghans clinging to military aircraft as they took off before falling to their deaths, to a suicide bombing that killed 169 Afghans and 13 U.S. service members, marked a bitter end to America's longest war.
The Taliban assumed control of the airport after the last American forces flew out and are now working to restore operations with technical experts from Qatar and Turkey. The Taliban say they will allow free travel for anyone with proper documents, but it remains to be seen whether any commercial airlines will offer service.
Officials from Pakistan International Airlines have met with Afghanistan's still-independent civil aviation administration. But Abdullah Hafeez, a spokesman for the airline, said it will take ``some time'' to clean up the debris and restore normal operations.
``There is still a lot of work to be done before international flights can come into the airport,'' he said.


Clic here to read the story from its source.