Egypt, China agree to complete work at business district in New Capital    Saudi TV says missile or drone intercepted over Riyadh    Egypt sees 748 new coronavirus cases, 52 deaths on Friday    Egypt's Sisi to inaugurate fish farming project in Port Said Saturday    N.Korea sees talks as way to advance nuclear program, says US intel official    Swimming Australia eyes Plan B in case of Tokyo cancellation    Arsenal fan Mat Ryan delighted with loan switch to London side    IMF urges deficit control in Tunisia even as protesters demand jobs    Egypt reports 748 new coronavirus cases, 52 deaths on Friday    Egypt, China sign agreement to complete work at business district in New Administrative Capital    Italy reports 472 coronavirus deaths on Friday, 13,633 new cases    UK estimates COVID-19 infections falling, but warns cases still high    Biden ordering stopgap help as talks start on big aid plan    Fernandes and Cavani have made Man Utd contenders, says Rooney    Egypt's parliament approves re-extending state of emergency for three months    AfDB, EIB ink joint action plan to boost public, private investments in Africa amid COVID-19    Egypt signs five gold exploration deals with $13m investment    Donald Trump says goodbye to the White House    BREAKING: Egypt resumes diplomatic relations with Qatar ending 4-year boycott    Egypt reports 899 new coronavirus cases, 58 deaths on Tuesday    Back, and better    Egypt's newly elected parliament reviews the government reform plan    Happy New Year Bel Araby show at The Marquee Theatre is a must go    Isis Temple reopens    New discoveries at Saqqara    Egypt sends medical supplies to help Jordan battle coronavirus    Egypt government allocates $1.6 billion to buy COVID-19 vaccines – FinMin    Egypt eyes gradual return for tourism after revenues fall to $4 bln in 2020    Seasoned Egyptian screenwriter Wahid Hamed dies at 76    Coronavirus strikes Egypt's youth team as 17 players, coach test positive    Nassef Sawiris plans to up his stake in owner of New York Knicks, Rangers    Cairo International Book Fair suspended for five months over coronavirus concerns    Egypt unveils largest archaeological discovery in 2020 with over 100 intact sarcophagi    Trump says won't blame Egypt for being ‘upset' over GERD dispute with Ethiopia    Egypt, Ethiopia, Sudan to resume Nile dam talks today    Global Finance: Egypt's Tarek Amer among the world's top 20 central bank governors    The Facebook Preacher's Search for Fame, and Egypt's Economy    Egypt calls on UNSC to address oil spill risks off Yemen coast    Egypt economically strong in face of COVID-19, reforms ongoing: International Cooperation Minister    Arafa Holding reports $144,000 COVID-19-related losses in April    Egypt's efforts in Libya to activate free will of Libyan people: Al-Sisi    Hyksos campaigns were internal takeover, not foreign invaders: study    COVID-19 affects Egypt sporting clubs    COVID-19 will soon turn to seasonal like swine flu: Presidential Health Advisor    ‘Egypt's Support' coalition convenes to discuss its Senate election list    Robbery attempt leads to discovery of Ptolemaic monuments in Qena    Flouting international guidance, Ethiopia unilaterally starts filling its Nile dam    Zaha speaks out after online racial abuse    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.





WHO decries "collective failure" as measles kills 140,000
Published in Ahram Online on 06 - 12 - 2019

Measles infected nearly 10 million people in 2018 and killed 140,000, mostly children, as devastating outbreaks of the viral disease hit every region of the world, the World Health Organization said on Thursday.
In figures described by its director general as "an outrage", the WHO said most of last year's measles deaths were in children under five years old who had not been vaccinated.
"The fact that any child dies from a vaccine-preventable disease like measles is frankly an outrage and a collective failure to protect the world's most vulnerable children," said the WHO's director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreysus.
The picture for 2019 is even worse, the WHO said, with provisional data up to November showing a three-fold increase in case numbers compared with the same period in 2018.
The United States has already reported its highest number of measles cases in 25 years in 2019, while four countries in Europe - Albania, the Czech Republic, Greece and Britain – lost their WHO "measles-free" status in 2018 after suffering large outbreaks.
An outbreak in the South Pacific nation of Samoa has infected more than 4,200 people and killed more than 60, mostly babies and children, in a battle complicated by a vocal anti-vaccination movement.
In 2018, measles hit hardest in Liberia, Ukraine, Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar and Somalia, the WHO said, with these five nations accounting for nearly half of all cases worldwide.
Globally, measles vaccination rates have stagnated for almost a decade. The WHO and the UNICEF children's fund say that in 2018, around 86% of children got a first dose of measles vaccine through routine vaccination plans, and fewer than 70% got the second dose recommended to fully protect them.
STAGGERING
Heidi Larson, director of the Vaccine Confidence Project at Britain's London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, said the numbers were "staggering".
"Some countries are scrambling to vaccinate in the face of serious outbreaks - far too late for many," she said.
Measles is one of the most contagious known diseases, more so than Ebola, tuberculosis or flu. It can linger in the air or on surfaces for several hours after an infected person has been and gone, putting anyone not vaccinated at risk.
Among wealthier nations, vaccination rates have been hurt by some parents shunning them for what they say are religious or philosophical reasons. Mistrust of authority and debunked myths about links to autism also weaken vaccine confidence and lead some parents to delay protecting their children.
Research published in October showed that measles infection not only carries a risk of death or severe complications including pneumonia, brain damage, blindness and deafness, but can also damage the victim's immune memory for months or years - leaving those who survive measles vulnerable to other dangerous diseases such as flu or severe diarrhoea.
The WHO data showed there were an estimated 9,769,400 cases of measles and 142,300 related deaths globally in 2018. This compares to 7,585,900 cases and 124,000 deaths in 2017.
Charlie Weller, head of vaccines at the Wellcome Trust global health charity, said the numbers were a tragedy. "If we are to protect lives, we must understand and address the reasons why measles vaccine uptake is lower," she said.


Clic here to read the story from its source.