Facebook says it removed 3.2B fake accounts in 6 months    Egypt releases Al-Jazeera journalist for father's funeral    Egypt coach unfazed by Salah absence in Nations Cup qualifying games    '28th Arab Music Festival sets record in number of audience and revenues': Ministry of Culture    Pneumonia kills a child every 39 seconds, health agencies say    Insomnia symptoms increase risk of heart attack and stroke    Protesters blockade universities, stockpile makeshift weapons as chaos grips Hong Kong    Fresh protests in Lebanon; no sign of new government    PUBG Mobile unveils Royale Pass Season 10 with massive content update    China cheated America on trade, but he blames US leaders for letting it happen: Trump    Most Gulf stocks fall as oil prices decline    Son is ready to show his quality against Lebanon, says South Korea coach    U.S. has no intention of ending alliance with Syrian Kurdish fighters    Spanish striker David Villa set to retire from Japan club    Gold little changed on doubts over US-China trade deal, dollar firms    Nobel's champions of peace    European markets to open lower as US-China trade concerns resurface    A tour in prison    GERD: An ‘adaptive' agreement    A film is born    Requiem for a dream    Gold falls back    Egypt MPs meet with EU diplomats in Cairo to discuss human rights criticisms    Ministry of Investment organises visit for African ambassadors to New Administrative Capital    10 tips to have your 30s starting a lifelong success    Nike to investigate its Oregon Project following Mary Cain's NYT op-ed    ‘Shining' sequel ‘Doctor Sleep' targets $25 mln opening, has Stephen King's blessing    Sisi: Egypt believes in comprehensive approach to human rights    UK University of Hertfordshire to open campus in Egypt new capital    Egypt's bourse, banks to close Sunday to mark Prophet Muhammad's birth    Egypt rejects politicised reports on human rights conditions – parliament    Egypt to vote on 3-month extension of state of emergency Monday    Jurgen Klopp gives injury update on Egypt's Mohamed Salah    Al Pacino says follows this mantra on every acting job    Remembering Mustafa Mahmoud, philosopher of his time    Egypt's Ahly Ramadan Sobhi on Serie A clubs' radar: agent    Court sentences six to death, 41 to lifetime imprisonment violence related case    Trump says he would release Mideast peace plan after Israeli elections    ACWA Power compares 3 bids to supply production units for Luxor power station    What do you know about gold alloying?    NBE announces EGP 2.5m prizes for handball youth teams for their world achievements    Jennifer Lopez evokes Egyptian outrage post her North Coast performance    Al-Sisi honours Egypt's scholars on Science Day    IS claims responsibility for suicide bombing killing 63 in Afghan wedding    Political parties gear up for parliamentary, senate, local elections    Unprecedented Glory: Egypt win Men's U-19 World Handball Championship    12th National Egyptian Theatre Festival fuel up public theatre art scene    Ministry of Environment has a plan for "black clouds season"    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.





Turkey and Russia to discuss removal of Kurdish militia from Syrian towns
Published in Ahram Online on 20 - 10 - 2019

Turkey and Russia will discuss the removal of the Syrian Kurdish YPG militia from the northern Syrian towns of Manbij and Kobani during talks in Sochi next week, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said on Sunday.
Turkey paused its military offensive into northeastern Syria after President Tayyip Erdogan agreed on Thursday, in talks with U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, a five-day ceasefire to allow the YPG to withdraw from a "safe zone" Ankara aims to establish near its border.
The truce is also aimed at easing a crisis triggered by U.S. President Donald Trump's abrupt decision this month to withdraw all 1,000 U.S. troops from northern Syria, a move criticised in Washington and elsewhere as a betrayal of Kurdish allies who had fought for years alongside U.S. troops against Islamic State.
But Trump's move also means the extent of Turkey's ambitions in the region is likely to be determined by Russia and Iran, who both support Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and are looking to fill the vacuum created by the U.S. retreat.
Assad has already deployed his forces in territory formerly protected by Washington, invited by the Kurds. Erdogan, who has backed rebels fighting to oust Assad, has said Turkey has no problem with Syrian government forces deploying near the border.
Speaking at an interview with broadcaster Kanal 7 on Sunday, Cavusoglu said urgent talks between Erdogan and Russia's Vladimir Putin would be held next week.
"We will discuss the removal of the YPG terrorists from our borders, namely Manbij and Kobani, with the Russians," Cavusoglu said.
"We believe we can reach an agreement with them to work together in the future, just like we have before."
Ankara regards the YPG, the main component of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), as a terrorist group because of its links to Kurdish insurgents in southeast Turkey. The YPG has been a close U.S. ally in the fight against Islamic State.
The SDF and Damascus struck a deal this month to counter the Turkish offensive in northeastern Syria, prompting Syrian army forces to deploy in Manbij and Kobani, towns of strategic importance given their location on the Syrian border with Turkey.
While Erdogan and Putin have forged close ties over defence and energy cooperation, Moscow has said the Turkish offensive into Syria was "unacceptable" and should be limited.
Erdogan on Saturday said he would also discuss Syrian army deployment in northern Syria with Putin, saying the two needed to find a solution to the matter. But he warned that "we will continue to implement our own plans" if a solution could not be reached, without elaborating.
Russian officials had spoken to Assad on Friday about the need to de-escalate the situation in northeast Syria, Russia's foreign ministry said on Saturday.

Fragile truce
The surprise deal to suspend Turkey's military offensive in Syria hinged on Erdogan's demand that Washington agrees on a time limit on any ceasefire, a senior Turkish official told Reuters on Friday.
The deal aims to stem a humanitarian crisis that has displaced 200,000 civilians in the region and at the same time ease security concerns over thousands of Islamic State captives guarded by the YPG.
Though the fragile truce held for the first two days of the agreement, Turkey's defence ministry said on Sunday that one Turkish soldier was killed and another was wounded after a YPG attack with anti-tank and light arms hit soldiers on a reconnaissance and surveillance mission in northeast Syria's Tel Abyad.
It said Turkish forces had responded to the attack and that 20 acts violating the deal were committed by the YPG since the start of the truce.
A separate statement from the ministry late on Saturday said that a convoy of 39 vehicles had entered and exited the border town of Ras al Ain to evacuate injured people.
On Friday the Kurdish militia accused Turkey of violating the five-day pause by shelling civilian areas in the northeast. A senior Turkish official denied the accusations and said they were an attempt to sabotage the truce.
However, Erdogan warned on Saturday that Turkey would resume the offensive and "crush the heads of terrorists" if the agreement faltered, with Turkey insisting it is Washington's duty to ensure the withdrawal of the YPG.
Cavusoglu reiterated that warning on Saturday, saying the offensive would continue if U.S. promises were not kept. He said Turkey did not want to see "a single terrorist" left in the "safe zone" by the end of the five days.
Turkey's defence ministry said late on Saturday that it was monitoring the withdrawal of the YPG and was in close contact with U.S. officials to provide logistical information.


Clic here to read the story from its source.