Egypt's NTRA tests quality of mobile services in June    Australia's Melbourne clamps down in frantic bid to curb virus    Egypt requires top taxpayers to issue e-invoices mid-November    Egypt sees unprecedented increase in investment spending – minister    Lebanon's foreign minister resigns amid economic crisis    China says it opposes any US actions against Chinese software firms    Egypt says Turkish survey in Mediterranean a violation of sovereign rights    Premier League start date too early for Chelsea: Lampard    FIFA says no reason for Swiss authorities to investigate Infantino    Lord & Taylor, Men's Wearhouse owner file for bankruptcy amid pandemic woes    Kuwait to review suspension of flights from Egypt – ministry    Mass jailbreak in Afghanistan, at least 24 die in Islamic State attack    167 new coronavirus cases, 31 deaths recorded in Egypt on Sunday    Switzerland should tighten coronavirus restrictions again: Govt advisor    Drogba submits candidacy to become Ivory Coast FA president    Egypt's Sisi congratulates UAE on its first Arab nuclear power plant    EgyptAir cancels scheduled flights to Kuwait until further notice    Churches in Egypt to be reopened gradually on Monday    Egypt invites Tesla's founder to visit Giza Pyramids after controversial tweets    Kenya Airways resumes international flights after virus curbs lifted    Kuwait bans flights to several 'high risk' countries, including Egypt    Egypt pumps more coins into market during Eid Al-daha holiday    Sisi: Egypt favours negotiations over a military solution to resolve Nile dam crisis: Al-Sisi    Death of young actor fuels debate on nepotism in Bollywood    Moroccan Houda Abouz break through in rap scene dominated by men    Egyptian film 'Saheb El-Maqam' to premier on Shahid in Adha feast    Egypt rejects unilateralism compromising right to Nile water, Sisi tells South African counterpart    No room to delay Egyptian Premier League games – EFA's board member    Egypt's National Elections Authority released on Friday a tutorial video for Egyptians for how to vote in the upcoming senate elections due to coronavirus pandemic    Egypt's President Sisi ratifies extending state of emergency for 3 months    Egypt's Sisi extends state of emergency for three months    Egypt Cup games to resume after Premier League finishes: EFA    The Facebook Preacher's Search for Fame, and Egypt's Economy    Egypt economically strong in face of COVID-19, reforms ongoing: International Cooperation Minister    Arafa Holding reports $144,000 COVID-19-related losses in April    Egypt's efforts in Libya to activate free will of Libyan people: Al-Sisi    Egypt calls on UNSC to address oil spill risks off Yemen coast    Hyksos campaigns were internal takeover, not foreign invaders: study    Reports over Ethiopia filling mega-dam    Foreign player numbers in Egyptian Premier League clubs to not change next season    COVID-19 affects Egypt sporting clubs    COVID-19 will soon turn to seasonal like swine flu: Presidential Health Advisor    ‘Egypt's Support' coalition convenes to discuss its Senate election list    Robbery attempt leads to discovery of Ptolemaic monuments in Qena    Flouting international guidance, Ethiopia unilaterally starts filling its Nile dam    Google ‘translate' ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs    Zaha speaks out after online racial abuse    Farwell to 74-year old Egyptian military production minister El-Assar    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.





North Korea missile detected by THAAD, program progressing faster than expected: South
Published in Ahram Online on 16 - 05 - 2017

North Korea's missile program is progressing faster than expected, South Korea's defense minister said on Tuesday, after the UN Security Council demanded the North halt all nuclear and ballistic missile tests and condemned Sunday's test-launch.
Han Min-koo told South Korea's parliament the test-launch had been detected by the controversial U.S. THAAD anti-missile system, whose deployment in the South has infuriated China.
The reclusive North, which has defied all calls to rein in its weapons programs, even from its lone major ally, China, said the missile test was a legitimate defense against U.S. hostility.
The North has been working on a missile, mounted with a nuclear warhead, capable of striking the U.S. mainland.
U.S. President Donald Trump's administration has called for an immediate halt to Pyongyang's provocations and has warned that the "era of strategic patience" with North Korea is over.
U.S. Disarmament Ambassador Robert Wood said on Tuesday China's leverage was key and it could do more.
Han said Sunday's test-launch was "successful in flight".
"It is considered an IRBM (intermediate range ballistic missile) of enhanced caliber compared to Musudan missiles that have continually failed," he said, referring to a class of missile designed to travel up to 3,000 to 4,000 km (1,860 to 2,485 miles).
Asked if North Korea's missile program was developing faster than the South had expected, he said: "Yes."
Han said the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) anti-missile unit deployed by the U.S. military in the South detected the North Korean missile, marking the first time the controversial system has been put to use since its deployment last month.
China has strongly opposed THAAD, whose radar it fears could be used to spy into its territory, despite assurances from Washington that THAAD is purely defensive. South Korean companies, from automakers to retailers and cosmetics firms, have been hit in China by a nationalist backlash over Seoul's decision to deploy the system.
The North's KCNA news agency said Sunday's launch tested its capability to carry a "large-size heavy nuclear warhead". Its ambassador to China said in Beijing on Monday it would continue such test launches "any time, any place".
The test-launch was a legitimate act of self-defense and U.S. criticism was a "wanton violation of the sovereignty and dignity of the DPRK", a North Korean diplomat told the U.N. Conference on Disarmament in Geneva on Tuesday.
DPRK are the initials of North Korea's official name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.
"The DPRK will bolster its self-defense capabilities as long as the United States continues its hostile policies toward the DPRK and imposes nuclear threats and makes blackmail," diplomat Ju Yong Choi said.
The missile flew 787 km (489 miles) on a trajectory reaching an altitude of 2,111.5 km (1,312 miles), KCNA said.
Pyongyang has regularly threatened to destroy the United States, which it accuses of pushing the Korean peninsula to the brink of nuclear war by conducting recent military drills with South Korea and Japan.
Trump and new South Korean President Moon Jae-in will meet in Washington next month, with North Korea expected to be high on the agenda, the South's presidential Blue House said.
Moon met Matt Pottinger, overseeing Asian affairs at the U.S. National Security Council, on Tuesday and said he hoped to continue to have "sufficient, close discussions" between Seoul and Washington, the Blue House press secretary told a briefing.
"FURTHER SANCTIONS POSSIBLE"
In a unanimous statement, the 15-member UN Security Council on Monday said it was of vital importance that North Korea show "sincere commitment to denuclearization through concrete action and stressed the importance of working to reduce tensions".
"To that end, the Security Council demanded the Democratic People's Republic of Korea conduct no further nuclear and ballistic missile tests," the council said, adding that it was ready to impose further sanctions on the country.
The North's foreign ministry rejected the statement, saying it infringed on its right to self-defense, particularly as the missile was test-launched at a sharp angle to ensure safety of neighboring countries.
The UN statement also condemned an April 28 ballistic missile launch by Pyongyang.
Following that launch, Washington began talks with China on possible new U.N. sanctions. Traditionally, the United States and China have negotiated new measures before involving remaining council members.
The United States sees China as key, U.S. Disarmament Ambassador Wood told reporters on a conference call.
"I'm not going to talk about various policy options that we may or may not consider, but I will say this: we are certainly engaged right now in looking at a number of measures - political, economic, security - to deal with these provocative acts by the DPRK, and dangerous acts in many cases," he said.
"So we are going to be raising the level of engagement with China on this issue. China really is the key in dealing with the North Korea issue. Ninety percent of the DPRK's trade is with China, so clearly there is a lot more leverage that China has, and we would like China to use."
The Security Council first imposed sanctions on North Korea in 2006 and has stiffened them in response to its five nuclear tests and two long-range rocket launches. Pyongyang is threatening a sixth nuclear test.
Trump warned in an interview with Reuters this month that a "major, major conflict" with North Korea was possible. In a show of force, the United States sent an aircraft carrier strike group, led by the Carl Vinson, to waters off the Korean peninsula to conduct drills with South Korea and Japan.
Admiral Harry Harris, the top U.S. commander in the Asia-Pacific, said continued missile launches by North Korea showed the importance of the alliance between Japan and the United States and called the North's actions unacceptable.
Harris met Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who also said China could apply more pressure to rein in North Korea.
"Now is the time to put pressure on North Korea," Abe said. "Japan and the United States must coordinate and put pressure."
The U.S. Seventh Fleet carrier, the Ronald Reagan, left Yokosuka in Japan on Tuesday on its regular spring patrol and will be out for around three to four months, a Seventh Fleet spokesman said.
Besides worries about North Korea's missile and nuclear weapons programs, cyber security researchers have found technical evidence they said could link the North with the global WannaCry "ransomware" cyber attack that has infected more than 300,000 computers in 150 countries since Friday.


Clic here to read the story from its source.