Forgiveness: The Secret of Peace    Alganesh: finding hope in abyss    USAID, local partners discuss development of Egypt's livestock production systems    Thousands of visitors line up to explore Tutankhamun's life    On pleasing audience: Mahmoud Hemeda gives acting masterclass during Luxor African Film Festival    Two smuggled statues retrieved from Switzerland    Expanding services in oil sector is essential to maximising value: Petroleum minister    Mueller's report has been completed, debate continues    More floods loom as high river waters recede in US Midwest    Zimbabwe confirm death of fan before Cup of Nations qualifier    Ethiopian Airlines CEO promises to get to bottom of flight 302 crash    Tennis: Djokovic beats Delbonis, stays on track for seventh Miami title    Southgate says youngsters will handle hostile Montenegro atmosphere    'Time's up, Theresa'? PM May urged to set her own exit date to get Brexit deal    Mamish, El-Gazzar head Egyptian delegation to Makkah Economic Forum 2019    Egypt's Parliament expected to conclude dialogue over constitutional amendments in April    Al-Sisi, King Abdullah, Abdul-Mahdi agree on economic coordination, fighting terrorism    British Petroceltic files arbitration case against EGPC    Government negotiates with Hassan Allam to establish 2 water treatment plants for EGP 2bn    Not German Christian Democrats    Uber to announce deal to buy rival Careem as early as this week: Bloomberg    Up-fuse, Farahzada El Shihy create ‘The Ripples'    Irrigation Minister asks Egyptians to be ‘more concerned' over water scarcity    Gap between rich, poor in Egypt shrinking, middle class doing worse: LSE Director    Jadon Sancho is the type of player England has and Germany wants    Euro 2020 qualifying: Germany look to emulate neighbors in period of evolution    Supreme Media Council block Al-Mashhad newspaper    Passengers airlifted from cruise ship stranded off Norway    Pope accepts resignation of Chilean cardinal accused of covering up abuse    Meet Egypt's youngest female football coach    Tutankhamun goes to Paris    Disney closes $71B deal for Fox entertainment assets    International Universities to start its next academic year in the New Capital    Darts for all    Greta    To be continued    A Broken Window play is the latest at Taliaa Theatre, don't miss it    Mustafa Al-Razzaz's art is on show at the Gezira Arts Centre    Don't miss Asmaa Waguih's photography show at the AUC Photographic Gallery    New horizons    Diaa Rashwan    Christchurch terror    Another year for Syria?    National dialogue begins    Egypt parliament provisionally approves bill on protecting personal data    Uganda releases 14 Egyptian expats after embassy intervention    Right man for the right job    Egypt's Court of Cassation upholds verdict putting 169 Brotherhood members on terror list    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.





Jordan to rethink controversial cybercrimes law
Published in Ahram Online on 09 - 12 - 2018

Jordan is to withdraw proposed amendments to a cybercrimes bill submitted to parliament that rights activists say would stifle freedom of expression, the government spokesman said on Sunday.
The bill has angered broad swathes of public opinion, including demonstrators who took to the streets in the last 10 days to protest against IMF-backed austerity measures, who say the proposed law will silence dissent in social media.
The legislation sent to parliament last September will be resubmitted only after the government has engaged with civil society representatives and experts, spokesman Jumana Ghunaimat told the state news agency Petra.
"The government will study again the draft law before redrafting it in light of existing laws," Ghunaimat said.
Two officials said Prime Minister Omar Razzaz's move to pull the cybercrimes law was intended to defuse a crisis that could cause a repeat of the big protests last summer over tax rises that brought down his predecessor.
Activists are calling for a major protest on Thursday against austerity measures and the IMF-backed tax law passed last month by the mainly pro-government parliament.
Amnesty International last month said the proposed amendments to the cybercrimes law passed in 2015 would "deal a devastating blow to freedom of expression in Jordan".
Rights activists say the amendments include criminalising hate speech using too broad a definition of the offence and introducing tougher penalties such as longer prison terms for online crimes.
"The proposed changes to Jordan's already flawed cybercrimes law are extremely worrying. Instead of taking steps to protect people's rights online the authorities appear to be moving backwards, introducing changes that would further suppress freedom of expression," said Heba Morayef, Amnesty International's Middle East and North Africa Director.
"Jordan's authorities have an appalling track record when it comes to silencing critics both on and offline," Morayef added.
With print and broadcast media loyal to the state and no major organised opposition political parties, social media has become a channel for dissent.
Officials have said there was a need for tougher laws with the internet being used to slander politicians and incite social discord.
King Abdullah, without referring to the bill, has also supported tightening online laws, saying unfair accusations against officials had paralysed government decision-making.


Clic here to read the story from its source.