Storming Press Syndicate is the responsibility of the ruling regime, secretary    ‘Silence Regime' in Damascus Suburbs Extended For Two Days    Leicester's Vardy named football writers' player of the year    Egypt could turn to International Arbitration over Ethiopia's dam, sources    Egypt's press syndicate stages indefinite strike against police raid    Formula One: Mercedes surprised by Ferrari's lack of pace    Leicester champagne on ice, City crash at Southampton    Germany's right-wing AfD party adopts anti-Islam manifesto    CIA 'live tweets' Osama bin Laden raid to mark five-year anniversary    Turkey hits IS group in Syria, 63 militants killed    African parliament to revive Egypt's membership, following 3-year suspension    Press Syndicate hashtag dominates Twitter    Gold futures up by 0.1% on global cues    MP Abdel Rehim Ali slams EJS storming, submits urgent parliamentary statement on the incident    Egypt's police arrest two journalists at Press Syndicate    Ministerial visit to Rasheed to evaluate archeological sites    Gulf markets pull back; banks weigh on Saudi, Abu Dhabi    IEA chief says oil price bottoming depends on global growth    9 balloons carrying 176 tourists fly over skies of Luxor    Hot weather forecast across Egypt during Easter holiday    Exxon Mobil reaches bottom of the oil barrel    Egypt's arts and culture: The best of March/April 2016    Businessmen MPs may form lobby in Egypt new parliament    Breaking: an explosion in Turkey kills at least one, leaves 14 injured    Apple's stock suffers worst week since 2013    U.S. delegation to review security measures in Cairo and Sharm-El Sheikh airports    Ministry of Supply declares emergency during Easter celebration    At a glance: Egypt's arts and culture in April 2016    New winner of expelled MP Tawfik Okasha's seat announced after by-election    PHOTO GALLERY: Holy fire ceremony in Jerusalem draws thousands    Trial of policeman who killed street vendor over 'cup of tea' starts 14 May    ‘Serious' co-operation on Regeni case would normalise Rome-Cairo relations: Italian FM    With weak earnings in tow, focus turns to jobs data    Saudi builder Binladin terminates 50,000 jobs    Death toll from collapse of Nairobi building hits seven - Kenyan police    Antiquities minister inspects 2 museums in Minya    Austrian presidential election too close to call, poll suggests    PHOTO GALLERY: Love Story, Bollywood musical comes to Egypt with vibrant music and colors    Biden to see Pope Francis, discuss cancer cures at Vatican    MUSIC AND DANCE    MUSEUMS    When doves cry    Adrenaline rush    Victory in Africa    Surprise promotions    Sisi attends inauguration of new interior ministry HQ in New Cairo    FIFA threatens to suspend Egypt over court ruling    Platinum Club brings the 1st Real Madrid Foundation Technical Academy to Egypt    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.





Opinion: Removing fig leaves from White House men
Published in The Egyptian Gazette on 19 - 02 - 2012

CAIRO - Perhaps for the first time in US foreign diplomacy, Washington's officials and congressmen are campaigning to punish and topple an Egyptian Cabinet minister for removing the fig leaves from the guys in the White House and congress.
Frothing at the mouth, anti-Muslim congressmen are out for the scalp of Egyptian Minister of International Co-operation Fayza Abul-Naga for uncovering the US-led conspiracy against the Egyptian people and their revolution.
Everybody across the world knows beyond any doubt that Washington has the tradition of mobilising its huge financial, intelligence, logistic and military resources and facilities to remove maverick heads of state or leaders, who overstep the line and make sure that Washington can't stick its nose into their internal affairs.
There are victims of this US policy in many countries. They include Manuel Noriega, the former military governor of Panama, who was captured and detained as a prisoner of war during the 1989 US invasion of Panama, late Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, whose country was attacked in 2003 based on false and fabricated reports about its stockpile of nuclear weapons, late Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, whose country was bombed by the US air force in 1986, etc. etc.
Since this week's article is entirely devoted to the war against the Egyptian minister, I am about to prepare a series of articles (to be published in book form) about the American policies against heads of state and world leaders in modern history.
It will be interesting for the reader to discover that the victims of the fierce US bulldogs include Washington's closest and biggest supporters, such as former president Hosni Mubarak and the Shah of Iran. Anyway, let's get to this week's main topic.
For the first time in 30 years, Washington has been snubbed by an Egyptian Cabinet minister for its suspicious role in the counterrevolution in Egypt. Fayza Abul-Naga, the Minister of International Co-operation, has bluntly accused the US administration of President Barack Obama, in collaboration with the US Congress, of entertaining sentiments against the January 25 Revolution, which overthrew Hosni Mubarak. The latter had been officially celebrated in decision-making circles in Washington and Tel Aviv as their biggest ally in the Middle East.
Abul-Naga, dubbed the Iron Lady by prominent and ordinary Egyptians, is the only minister from Mubarak's regime, who has survived a series of post-revolution Cabinet reshuffles. She bid farewell to all her colleagues in the Cabinet of Ahmed Nazif and his two successors Ahmed Shafiq and Essam Sharaf. She kept her ministerial portfolio in the national salvation government formed by Prime Minister Kamal el-Ganzouri.
It seems to me that Abul-Naga is being groomed to succeed el-Ganzouri in case he suddenly resigns for any reason, such as his health. She is acting as Cabinet spokesperson during weekly press conferences to explain how the Government is dealing with the ‘hard tasks' it has been given.
In her testimony in connection with the legal investigations into the alleged illegal and hostile activities by local NGOs directly linked to the US Congress and Germany, Abul-Naga accused Washington of masterminding and financing the recent tragic violence in Egypt.
She told the prosecutors that Washington channelled hundreds of millions of dollars to ‘elements' disguised as NGOs. She said openly that the ultimate goal of those who deliberately instigated instability and chaos was the division of Egypt into three smaller states: Sinai, Upper Egypt and North Egypt – in the style of what happened in the Sudan. When officials raided NGO offices in Cairo and elsewhere, they found detailed maps of a fragmented Egypt.
These NGOs are managed and controlled by the US government-funded National Democratic Institute (founded by former secretary of state Madeleine Albright) and the International Republican Institute chaired by Republican Senator John McCain, who is scheduled to visit Egypt this week to help find a way out. The suspects include 16 US citizens, who have been banned from leaving Egypt, pending their trial at the criminal court in Cairo.
Rubbing salt into the wounds, the US administration and Congress are trying hard to humiliate Egypt as they threaten to cut military and economic aid, unless Cairo immediately release the US citizens and stop legal proceedings against them.
Having been caught red-handed, anti-Arab and anti-Muslim members of the US administration and Congress are calling for Abul-Naga's expulsion from the Cabinet for allegedly spoiling the US-Egyptian relationship.
Press reports have disclosed that Prime Minister Kamal el-Ganzouri has sent security men to Abul-Naga's residence due to warnings that her life was in danger. Her guards are also to escort her to the office.
Abul-Naga initially suspected the NGOs controversial role in 2005. Her advice to reject US aid and re-examine the aid policies was rejected outright by the then president Hosni Mubarak.


Clic here to read the story from its source.