Iraq may request Russian air strikes on Islamic State soon: Official    Microsoft launches Windows laptop    Egypt Super Cup is a difficult mission: Ahly's caretaker coach Zizo    Art Alert: A week for Beethoven aficionados in Cairo, Alexandria    Liverpool's Sakho says felt like 'caged lion' under Rodgers    FIFA's Blatter says Swiss investigation is 'outrageous'    Klopp expected to land in Anfield on Thursday: British media    Saudi Prince Alwaleed's Kingdom Holding raises Twitter stake    Asian shares hit seven-week high as oil jump eases supply worries    VW CEO says recall to start in January, be completed end-2016    Vodafone goes back to basics after failed Liberty deal    Egypt's left wing groups downcast ahead of parliamentary elections    Sisi rejects criticism of Saudi Arabia over Hajj tragedy    Freed Al Jazeera Journalist Mohamed Fahmy Leaves Egypt for Canada    Egyptian death toll in Mecca hajj stampede rises to 148    Egypt awards four offshore oil and gas exploration licences    Palestinians: Israel to destroy homes of alleged militants    Ex-Yemen president's party says accepts peace terms    wires- Benzene in traffic emissions tied to childhood leukemia    Egyptian death toll in Mecca hajj stampede rises to 148: Minister of religious endowment    Egypt's human rights council temporary freezes activity of members running for parliament    National Theatre's One of a Thousand Nights grosses LE1 million    U.S.: BP to pay $20 billion in fines for 2010 oil spill    Al Ahly sack coach and football director    NATO denounces Russian incursion into Turkish airspace    New VW chief to brief workers on fallout from scandal    Proverb of the day: A stranger is blind even though he can see الغريب اعمي و لو كان بصير    Proverb of the day: We taught them how to beg, they raced us to the doors (of possible donors) علمناهم الشحاتة سبقونا علي الأبواب    Sisi: Cabinet to remain in place if agenda approved by parliament    Egyptian death toll in Mecca hajj stampede rises to 146: Foreign ministry    Egypt coach Cuper calls for football fans return    INTERVIEW: Egypt's antiquities minister speaks on the search for Nefertiti in Tutankhamun's tomb    Egypt's bourse to close Tuesday for national holiday    Seven electoral lists run in first stage of Egypt's parliamentary elections: HEC    Egypt pledges fast work amid search for Nefertiti's tomb    Pressing Cairo's agenda    Meccan calls for Islamic renewal    A meatless feast?    Exploring Egypt    Zamalek do the double    In need of comebacks    Sufra Dayma: Fish fingers    Money talks    The IS factor    Tawadros' visit unrelated to GERD    Assyria calling    New discoveries in the Valley of the Kings?    Egypt: After the presidential pardons    

Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.

Your friends recommend

Threads of a tapestry: the lady that sells tissues
Published in Daily News Egypt on 04 - 09 - 2012

On one of Cairo's famous squares, Sabah Mahmoud and her two year old daughter sit quietly on the pavement. Mahmoud makes her living buying tissues and selling them for a small markup, but mostly she gets by on people's charity. “The people are very nice here and mostly they help me. Some tell me to get a job but they do not know how it is." She said she randomly picked the spot to sell her wares and that sometimes when she leaves and comes back, there is another woman in her place and she has to share, since there are no standardised rules about where people can sell. She says the police never bother her because she knows them and since the revolution, they do not seem to care.
Mahmoud has been in the square for five years. For 60 months, she has lied to her son, who is in middle school, about being on the street with his sister. “You do not understand", she said. “My son's future would be ruined if people found out. His friends would taunt him, it would be catastrophic."
She adamantly refused to have her picture taken. “Not even a picture of just the merchandise?" we asked. “No, not even." She explains that being from Upper Egypt if anyone found out about her selling tissues it would mean she would be stigmatised. “I come from a good family," she said, as if countering something we had said. She was a woman with pride. Despite of how she helps provide for her family and herself, her reputation remains her most valuable asset.

Clic here to read the story from its source.