Art Alert: Kremer to play on Stradivari violin in Egypt    Preview: holders Ahly face first stiff test in Egyptian league    Man City stumble again as late penalty earns CSKA 2-2 draw    Egypt court sets 1 January as date for Al Jazeera staff appeal    Sudan's Bashir chosen by ruling party as candidate for 2015 elections    Iran arrests several spies near Bushehr nuclear plant: Fars news agency    Egypt to present $1.5bn Cairo-6 October train plans at economic summit    Onera Systems installs solar panels to national grid    Business community rejects independent trade unions    Al-Sisi travels to Alexandria to oversee naval exercises    Libyan tribal leaders gather in Cairo for unity talks    Alleged drug trafficker killed by security forces in Qaliubiya    Hong Kong students put their case to govt, but no breakthrough    7 sentenced to death on terrorism-related charges    Supreme Electoral Commission urges voters to verify data    New companies to be listed on stock market: EGX chairman    36 referred to court for forming ‘terrorist' group    Egypt signs oil and gas exploration deal in Western Desert    Olympics: Oscar Pistorius jailed for five years for Steenkamp killing    Brighter China data fails to lift stocks, dollar sags    Alexandria student dies after sustaining birdshot injuries    Apple's Iphone Sales Beat Street But Ipad Volumes Slide    Tanta receives 3 million visitors participating in Moulid Al-Sayed Al-Badawy festival    Egypt-Israel Gas Deal Won't Happen without State's Approval – Official    IBM Struggles To Reinvent Itself In An Age Of Cloud    Total CEO De Margerie Killed In Moscow As Jet Hits Snow Plough    Train fire in 3 carriages kills one in Nile Delta    Egyptian Law Graduates Denounce Class-Based Job Discrimination    Heikal Apologises For Not Attending Ceremony In His Honour    Egypt's Irrigation Minister 'Totally Satisfied' With Recent Ethiopia Dam Talks    Egypt's main index up, joining global shares    Police storm Al-Azhar, fire teargas to break up protest by female students    Egypt refers 60 'pro-Brotherhood' judges to disciplinary board    Moody's Changes Egypt's Outlook To Stable From Negative, Affirms Caa1 Rating    Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia To Choose Int'l Firm By December    Egypt To 'Reconsider' Position On Nile Basin Cooperation    Seven Egyptian policemen killed in Sinai bomb attack    Warsaw upgrades exhibit of saved Sudanese art    Shorouk El-Zeftawy: Meet Egypt's Youngest Wildlife Director    Italy-Egypt Partnership Growing, From Culture To Business    Michael Jackson tops Forbes list of highest-earning dead celebrities    VIDEO: Egypt overcome stubborn Botswana again    Penelope Cruz Named 'Sexiest Woman Alive' By Esquire Magazine    Zamalek hire Portuguese Pacheco as manager    VIDEO: Elneny, Salah inspire Egypt with brilliant goals    EFA Official Rules Out Faking Of Injuries By Elmohamady And Ekrami    What are Egypt's chances of gaining UNSC non-permanent seat?    Cairo exhibition hosts photography from Middle East, North Africa    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.




Your friends recommend

A new platform of hope for Arab youth
Published in Daily News Egypt on 25 - 03 - 2012

DOHA: The Arab world today is home to millions of young people with hopes, plans and the desire to work. With more than 100 million young people between 15 and 29, representing 30 percent of the total population, the region is facing an unprecedented “youth bulge”.
This reality has led to many challenges when it comes to youth employment — but it can also be seen as an opportunity to foster youth-powered positive change, using social networks and technology to create much-needed impact.
Today, there simply aren't enough jobs for youth coming into the region's labor markets. Public sector jobs are no longer a guarantee for graduates, and the private sector is unable to grow fast enough. For example, in Egypt 600,000 young people enter the labor market each year, but only about 250,000 of them find a job.
The result: millions of young adults are forced to make a living on their own through self-employment, despite low incomes. For many of these micro-entrepreneurs — who have very small, self-owned enterprises — the only thing standing between subsistence level income and thriving, sustainable businesses is a lack of reliable, affordable capital. But too many financial institutions see young people as a risk when it comes to loaning money.
It may be time for others to help fill the gap.
Even though young Arabs may still be looking for work, they definitely have found their voice. The advent of technologies such as the internet, mobile phones and social media has provided young people with tools to help them make change happen. One way to drive change is to fund, engage and celebrate young people who are trying to make a living on their own, and show how we as individuals around the world can help foster change. Technology and social media play an important role in achieving this.
Accordingly, two organizations — Silatech, the Arab region's largest youth microenterprise support provider, and Kiva, the world's largest online micro-lending platform — have together created Kiva Arab Youth, an online platform that offers a way for people throughout the world to help young Arab entrepreneurs start or grow their businesses through small microloans of as little as $25. An example of how this works in practice is Shawgy, a 26-year-old man who lives in Taiz, Yemen.
He couldn't afford an education and decided to start his own shop, which he has run for four years to help support his family. He wants to increase his sales to offer his parents a better future — but in order to do so needs to buy more products that offer his customers more variety. He lacks the capital to do this on his own, but a small loan will allow him to buy more products and increase his sales. Kiva lenders — ordinary people around the world — can make small contributions towards loans for individuals like Shawgy in the Arab world through Kiva's online platform, which are matched by Silatech.
But this is only the start.
There is a clear opportunity for the creation of online peer-to-peer platforms in Arabic that connect charities, lenders and donors (in Arab countries and globally) — potentially including Islamic charitable giving — to self-employed young men and women from disadvantaged backgrounds. There is a growing movement in the Arab and Muslim worlds toward more strategic, capacity-building forms of charitable giving which focus on long-term, sustainable impact.
Sustainable giving models such as “revolving loan funds” (which are loaned, repaid and returned to the lender to be reinvested to help more people), or “social investments” (which direct investor attention towards projects which generate social, as opposed to purely financial, returns), provide an opportunity to use these technology platforms to enable more impactful giving. These can be created for the young, and potentially by the young as well.
If widely adopted by the Arab world, such technology initiatives could mobilize billions of dollars by re-focusing current streams of charitable giving. Forums like the World Congress of Muslim Philanthropists (WCMP), a global network of individuals, foundations and corporations advancing charitable giving, offer a significant opportunity to showcase potential solutions that increase engagement between donors and recipients and fund projects that have positive social impacts.
Organizations such as Silatech — through its stakeholders, sponsors and partners in Qatar and elsewhere in the Arab region — have an opportunity to spark such a discussion and influence strategies and mind-sets about innovative uses of technology, as well as new forms of social giving.
Opinion shapers, social entrepreneurs, religious figures and other influencers in the region should consider putting their support behind this and similar forms of sustainable social action.
Ramakant Vempati is Senior Advisor and Justin Sykes is Manager for Social Innovation at Silatech. This article was written for the Common Ground News Service (CGNews), www.commongroundnews.org.


Clic here to read the story from its source.