From the 1930s to the 1990s: New book collects Egypt's forgotten film posters    SFD Egypt in Talks with World Bank over New Loan    Rwanda's economy to expand 6.5 pct in 2015 and 2016: finance minister    Happily Ever-After Cambridge Duchess!    Bombing of Electricity Pylon halts Traffic near Egypt's Assiut    Live score: Chelsea v Crystal Palace (English Premier League)    Italy says 3,700 boat migrants rescued, operations ongoing    Egyptian court jails 16-year-old for 15 years on bombing charges    Suarez brings more than just goals to Barcelona attack    Energy Firm plans First Floating Power Plant in Egypt    US' Iowa at Emergency due Bird Flu Outbreak    Egyptian Tourism Authority opens its first GCC HQ in Abu Dhabi    Britney Spears cancels two Las Vegas concerts due injury    Amnesty: Egypt using Courts and Jail to intimidate Journalists    Sudan's Bashir invites Egypt's Sisi to attend his Inauguration Ceremony    Floyd Mayweather Jr. Defeats Manny Pacquiao in Boxing's Big Matchup    Proverb of the day: We mentioned the cat and it showed up, bouncing.    Egypt, China New Weapons Deal Sealed    Seattle police say prepared for more protests    New York City police officer shot in head, suspect in custody    Conservatives take one point lead over Labour ahead of Britain's May 7 vote: YouGov    Egypt's Elneny scores second Swiss league goal of season in Basel win    Egyptian army raids in Sinai kill 29 alleged militants: Spokesman    Security upped at Gaza-Egypt borders to protect both territories: Hamas    Ben E. King, famous for the hit song "Stand by Me" dies    Egypt's Bassem Youssef says El-Bernameg unlikely to return    Baltimore goes up in flames    Greece versus the euro    Entre Nous – Losing weight naturally    Sufra Dayma – Baby veal shanks in turmeric cumin sauce    Breifs    Al-Sisi: A year on    Commentary: Flying in the face of fact    Scenarios for Riyadh in Yemen    MUSIC AND DANCE    Remembering Mansoura    The elusive mushroom    Samra's slam    Field No 5    From Egypt to Eindhoven    Salah moving up, Garrido going out    Spain, Egypt to study Cairo-Luxor bullet train link    Nokia posts surprise drop in networks profit, shares fall    Proverb of the day: If it makes you win, go for it.    Pope decries "scandal" of lower salaries for women    BREAKING: Egyptian court acquits journalist Ahmed Gamal Ziyada    Egypt court criminalises strike at public offices    Chelsea's Eden Hazard named PFA Player of the Year    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.




Your friends recommend

Vatican fears increasingly unstable Arab world

VATICAN CITY: A Vatican expression of concern over the violence in Syria this week was the latest sign of deep misgivings in Catholic circles about Arab uprisings seen as a threat for Christian minorities.
"The pope has been rather silent on the Arab revolutions," said Marco Politi, a Vatican specialist for Italian daily Il Fatto Quotidiano.
"On the one hand the Holy See shares in the hope of a democratization of society. On the other, it is afraid of a strengthening of Islamism," he said.
He added that protecting Christian rights was "fundamental" for Pope Benedict XVI, who has made the issue one of the main features of his papacy.
Speaking on Thursday to Syria's new ambassador to the Holy See, Hussan Edin Aala, Benedict called on Damascus to "take into account the aspirations of civil society" and to recognize "the inalienable dignity of all people."
"Every nation's path to unity and stability lies in recognizing the inalienable dignity of all people. This recognition should be at the heart of institutions, laws and societies," the pope said at the audience.
The pontiff said the recent mass demonstrations against the government in Damascus "show the urgent need for real reforms" but called for "respect for truth and human rights" instead of "intolerance, discrimination or conflict".
Benedict said that Syria — where there has been a Christian presence for 2,000 years — had traditionally been "an example of tolerance, of conviviality and of harmonious relations between Christians and Muslims."
Some 7.5 percent of Syria's 20 million inhabitants are Christians and the community is well integrated. Many are afraid of a scenario similar to the one in Iraq that followed the fall of Saddam Hussein's Baathist regime.
The instability that exploded in Iraq following US-led military action in 2003 favored the rise of Islamist currents and the Christian community quickly shrank from around 800,000 in 2003 to only some 450,000 now.
Al-Qaeda militants have branded Christians "crusaders" and pushed them out.
Syria and Iraq are not the only headaches for the Holy See, which is concerned more generally about the 50 million Christians including five million Catholics out of the Middle East's 356 million inhabitants.
The Vatican has repeatedly called for a negotiated solution to the conflict in Libya, afraid that NATO-led intervention could be seen as aggression by the Christian world against Muslims and could fuel Islamism.
The Vatican's envoy to Libya, Giovanni Innocenzo Martinelli, who has remained in Tripoli, has been a vehement critic of NATO and of the West's refusal to dialogue with Libyan leader Moamer Qaddafi.
There are also fears that a destabilization in Syria could affect Lebanon, where Christians represent around 40 percent of the population.
In a meeting with Palestinian president Mahmud Abbas earlier this month, Benedict stressed the "irreplaceable contribution" of Christian minorities living in the Palestinian Territories and the Middle East as a whole.
Christians living in Israel and the Palestinian Territories represented around 25 of the population in the 19th century. Now they are just 1.5 percent, often fleeing due to insecurity, Israeli settlement and Islamist threats.
The Vatican is also worried about the rights of Christians in Algeria, Tunisia, Turkey and Egypt — where Christian Copts represent between six and 10 percent of the population and have been singled out in recent attacks.


Clic here to read the story from its source.