6 militants killed, 10 arrested in Rafah    Hunger striking detainees receive Ministry of Interior threats: Freedom of the Brave    Social Justice Coalition members increase to 27    Iran keen on seeing Egypt revive international and regional role    Central bank registers stable foreign reserves in August: Governor    July's CAPMAS inflation rate 0.18% higher than original figure    Ministerial meeting upcoming to resolve property tax crisis on hotels: Tourism ministry official    Ibrahim signs for Portugal's Maritimo    CIHR appeals to President Al-Sisi ‘to prevent disaster'    Conscript killed, 3 injured in car crash in Al-Farafa district    Police officer detained for sexually assaulting handicapped girl    Cosmetic surgery: Between medical ethics and ‘posthumanism'    Suez Canal Project Investment Certificates Available in EGP Only    Egypt Bourse Incurs Humble Losses on Arab Sell-offs    Good Planning Foundation Of Success; Egypt Lacks Prioritization Says Minister    VIDEO: Holders Egypt fail to reach African U-20 Championship    Ultras White Knights members detained after protest    Shoukry looks to increase cooperation on Europe tour    Egypt's identity: Hovering between love and rule of law    Egyptian, Kenyan Officials Discuss Bilateral Ties    Egyptian Police Arrest 2 Alleged Members Of Cairo Militant Group    Egyptian Police Disperse Ahrar Anti-Police, Anti-Military Protest    Egyptian Court Cancels Death Sentences Of Top Brotherhood Figures    Kerry Reassures Egypt Over Apache Delivery    Ahli to meet Cameroon's Coton on September 20    Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie Are Finally Married    Is It Time For Egypt's New Capital City?    Morocco's Benatia happy after sealing 'dream move' to Bayern    Cameroon's Eto'o raring to go after joining Everton    Islamic State commits war crimes, Syrian govt using poison gas :UN    BREAKING: Human rights activist Ahmed Seif El-Islam dies at 63    Dutch farmers dump tonnes of produce as Russian sanctions hit prices    Second round of literary festival attracts thousands of young Egyptians    OCI N.V. reports 9% net-profit rise in H1 2014    WHO urges stiff regulatory curbs on e-cigarettes    Manchester United's humiliation is Milton Keynes' glory    Syria, Iraq Tension Revives Business for Egypt Firms    Washington claims Egypt, UAE behind bombing raids in Libya    INTERVIEW-Wife of imprisoned aide to Egypt's Mursi brings case to UN    Dozens Protest At Cairo's Gezira Club Over Mass Killing Of Cats    Former health minister Mamdouh Gabr dies at 87    At Least 19 Killed in Bus Crash in Egypt's Luxor Today    Art Alert: First Jews of Egypt documentary to be screened at Zawya    Girls from Brazil's favelas find escape in ballet    Egyptian Court Adjourns Port Said Massacre Retrial To 21 September    War on Gaza stops award-winning director from attending Sarajevo film festival    Bringing international literature to the blind    Egyptian documentary ‘The Square' wins three Emmys    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.




Your friends recommend

Egypt reports massive sexual harassment during holiday
Published in Bikya Masr on 23 - 11 - 2010

CAIRO: Egyptian police stations reported at least 600 incidents of sexual harassment during the first day of the Eid al-Adha holiday last week. Police stations in Cairo, Giza, Helwan and Alexandria reported that as a result of streets being filled with young boys in celebration, there “were incidents of mass sexual harassment.”
Eid holiday sexual harassment has become commonplace in Egypt, as boys and young men continue to terrorize women on Egypt's streets during the festivals.
The investigations by the police said that Cairo governorate accounted for the largest number of cases of harassment against women and girls (246 incidents in total). According to local police stations, “it was limited to verbal harassment,” while Helwan governorate witnessed 37 cases of harassment; the number jumped to 110 cases in Giza; police departments in Alexandria received 165 reports and complaints of harassment.
A Security source told local newspapers that around 300 young boys were arrested in Cairo and charged with sexually harassing women during the celebration of Eid, and police stations “filed reports against some of the harassers and released others in the late hours of the same day.”
The source added that “the security presence on the streets and plans by the Directorate of Security to secure the parks and malls and main streets, helped curb the incidences of harassment, and that most of cases of harassment in Helwan and Giza took place around the Nile Corniche and in front of cinemas and malls in the main streets of downtown.”
He noted that security forces set up cordons around cinemas in the busiest streets of downtown Cairo.
In Alexandria, most of the incidents took place around the Corniche Road, and security forces were forced to deploy security personnel in civilian clothes, in an effort to reduce harassment.
Every Eid holiday since 2006, women have reported widespread harassment and sexual assaults.
During the Eid celebrations that followed the Holy Month of Ramadan that year, tens of young men and boys attacked female bystanders, ripping at their clothing and groping them, in the heart of downtown Cairo who were waiting for a local cinema to open. Shopkeepers were forced to hide women in order to escape the terror.
Eyewitnesses reported a number of injuries including cuts and bruises. It was the first time the media covered harassment in any great depth.
Egypt's interior ministry denied anything had occurred, arguing that “if something had occurred, people would have filed charges.”
Many women have told Bikya Masr they went to the police station only to be turned away by the officers who said it would be extremely difficult to prosecute anyone for harassment.
“The officer even said that if I was foreign or a diplomat's wife, the situation would have been different,” one young woman told Bikya Masr.
Many Egyptians, especially men, viewed the event as a pariah. This was an abnormal incident that saw youth simply get overwhelmed in the moment, they argued. Don't ask, don't tell remains the status quo in a country struggling with social order.
“Sure, this was massive in scale, but to say it is not a daily fear of women living here is to ignore the overall situation of sexual harassment,” said Heba, a victim of the downtown attacks who suffered deep cuts on her hands.
Years on, women are still facing the brunt of the attack, as even government officials have argued that women in the country are partially to blame for the treatment they are forced to put up with.
Mohsen Reda, an Egyptian Member of Parliament, argued that women should be dressed more modestly as “a lot of our youth can't afford marriage so it is only normal for some harassment to take place.”
Counterproductively, women often agree with the MP. In a 2007 report by the ECWR, a paragraph in the Arabic version, the same paragraph was later withheld from the English translation, said women in the country believe they are at fault for harassment.
“Some [Egyptian women] explained harassment as happening because people are [moving] away from religion,” the Arabic version reads, adding that “women often bring harassment [on themselves] because of the clothes they wear and the manner in which they carry themselves.”
Unfortunately, the problem isn't a small segment of society. According to an ECWR report, over 60 percent of men surveyed admitted they participate in harassing women.
As a consequence of the belief that their own actions often invite such unwanted attention, Egyptian women are most likely to be passive in the face of sexual harassment by males, unwilling to respond to threats, even if those threats become violent.
“I do nothing because I don't want to insult myself,” a young Coptic woman admitted, when asked her response to harassment.
“If I go home and tell my parents that I get harassed on the streets, they will say it is because of how I dress and won't let me go out anymore,” added the woman who asked to remain anonymous.
On one occasion, she said, while heading home from university when a group of men began to yell obscenities at her, forcing her to pick up her pace in order to avoid them.
When they got too close for comfort, she panicked, quickly jumping over the barrier toward the sidewalk, tripping and hurting her knee in the process, and being left with a large bruise and broken skin.
Making matters worse, 96 percent of foreign women surveyed admitted to being harassed daily. Of those, 7 percent said they would never return to Egypt and another 6 percent would warn their female friends away from the Arab world's largest nation.
Kate Dannies, a freelance journalist, who spoke to Bikya Masr in 2008 on the situation, is part of the growing foreign anger at the state of Egypt's busy streets.
“We [a friend and I] were walking to our car and suddenly we see a guy on the sidewalk and he is masturbating in front of us, and the sidewalk is pretty deserted, it's just us, so we didn't know what to do so we just tried to keep walking past him, but then he grabbed me and we started screaming and then he ran off,” she said.
What can be done, if anything, to end one of Egypt's most serious social problems?
Only a few years ago, women would have stayed quiet about these happenings, but this is changing as more women feel silence only continues the issue.
“The problem is that women did not have the ability to talk,” Nehad Abu Komsan, the chairwoman of the ECWR begins, “and they feel the shame and were afraid to talk, but now they are more free to talk and they know that they are not alone and this is not her fault.”
Komsan argues that this has helped Egyptian society understand what is going on and will help to solve this social issue. An important aspect of her work is helping to development society as a whole, not only within the activist community.
“It is not important to be a woman figure or a women defender. Women are an essential part of society, so as long as they are active in different fields they will defend their rights and other people's rights,” she adds.
She pointed to the appointment of Islamic notary, or Maazun in Arabic, Amal Soliman. The lawyer is the first female maazun in the Islamic world's history, and the 32-year-old mother does not want to be seen as an activist despite the attention her new job has brought.
“Sure, this was expected, although I didn't think it would take this long,” said Soliman, who holds a master's degree in law from Zagazig University. The Ministry of Justice has yet to give her the green light to begin work after months of waiting.
Blame is being leveled by many women in the country against the government, who they feel is not doing enough to stem the amount of harassment that persists.
“I think the government has a hand in this, not direct, but by not cracking down on the perpetrators they abet in this [harassment],” said 30-year graduate student Asma Abdel Khalek.
Whether Egyptians begin to take the issue seriously or whether generations of women living in the country will continue to face harassment is something all sections of society are beginning to deal with.
BM


Clic here to read the story from its source.