Argentina odds-on favourites to lift Copa America    Pentagon: 'No anticipation' U.S. might give up Guantanamo base    Egypt army says it killed 100 militants, lost 17 personnel in fight against IS Wednesday    Bus falls off bridge, killing 7 South Koreans, 2 Chinese    BREAKING: Egypt cabinet approves new terrorism and elections laws    Russia tries to soothe Baltic states over independence review    50 Deaths reported in ISIS Attacks, Egypt sends Fighter Jets    U.S. Stock Futures rally as Greece appears ready to accept Bailout Terms    Tennis: Nishikori pulls out of Wimbledon with calf strain    Telecom Egypt to receive 4G Mobile Licence next year – Minister    BREAKING: ISIS-affiliated Group claims responsibility for Sinai Attacks    Italian police arrest family of couple who traveled to Syria    Ben Affleck, Jennifer Garner announce Divorce after 10 years of Marriage    Another Black Church on Fire in South Carolina    U.S., Iran president's issue warnings as nuclear talks extended    New sports uniforms level the playing field for Muslim girls    Greece seeks Eurogroup, ECB support after IMF Default    Egypt arrests Suspect over Chief Prosecutor Assassination    Tennis: Federer and Kvitova feast on Wimbledon starters    Proverb of the day: Once he started a henna business (for weddings), sadness multiplied    BREAKING: Militants launch attacks on Egyptian military checkpoints in Sinai    Orange, Partner Communications set terms to end brand deal    Egypt's Emaar Misr says to list on Cairo bourse on July 5    Proverb of the day: The heart of a true believer will show him the way    Amnesty slams Egypt over Arrests of Youths    How much Greece owes to international creditors    Virtual reality pedals and dances its way into fitness classes    Ruling in Egypt Trial of Jazeera Journalists set for July 30    UAE offers Egypt Grant for 10-year Slum Development Project    Sisi announces Free Treatment for Military Personnel with Hepatitis C    Proverb of the day: "Stay away from evil and dig a canal for it to pass," they warned. "I will even sing its praises," he answered    Jason Statham to join Fast & Furious 8 !    A whirlwind tour    Something for everyone?    Preparing for a rainy day    Commentary: Selective pardons    Smarter taxis hit Egypt    ‘Forcibly disappeared'    Four of a kind    Flying to Rio    The race for the ace    Ready to be ratified    Geneva talks fail, for now    MUSIC AND DANCE    A traditional renaissance    Democracy, invention and citizenship    Alexandria hosts First International squash Tournament for Women    FIFA suspends 2026 World Cup's Bidding Process    







Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.




Your friends recommend

Wall built to end clashes over anti-Islam film; widespread indignation rages amongst protesters
Published in Almasry Alyoum on 14 - 09 - 2012

Another concrete-block wall is going up in Cairo, this time to separate the US Embassy in Cairo from the Omar Makram Mosque and Tahrir Square, the scene of clashes which began on Wednesday night, and were still continuing on Friday morning.
Protestors demanding the expulsion of the US ambassador over an anti-Islam film made in the US are taking part in running battles with Central Security Forces. Clouds of white smoke periodically fill the air as security forces try to disperse rock-throwing protesters with tear-gas. A limited number of empty shotgun rounds, of the sort used to fire birdshot, were seen by Egypt Independent reporters.
The group of a few hundred protesters was diverse in terms of age, and there was more than one dimension to their motives. For some, this was yet another occasion to settle accounts with the Interior Ministry, who they feel a deep-seated hatred towards due to police violence before, during and after the uprising last year.
A 21-year-old protester who requested anonymity is among those with a score to settle. “We are only here to claim our rights, and they are firing at us, beating us and arresting us. Nothing has changed in the Interior Ministry, it is still their job to beat us up,” he said.
However, slogans chanted by those at the clashes were predominantly colored with references to the Prophet, and most claimed to be there to “preserve the dignity of our Prophet,” as one protester put it.
Nearly all protesters Egypt Independent spoke to expressed a sense of humiliation over what they perceive to be a highly offensive depiction of the Prophet Mohamed.
“It is forbidden to depict the Prophet, especially when they say the exact opposite of the truth about him. Whereas he was compassionate, generous and forgiving, they depicted him as a bloodthirsty man who is only after sex,” says Othman al-Gharably, a 37-year-old member of the National Movement for Egypt, who saw excerpts of the film on social networking website Facebook.
“It is incumbent on all Muslims to defend our religious symbols, be they Islamic, Jewish or Christian. We respect everyone and do not do this to their prophets, so why do they have to insult ours?” he asks, adding that “Obama has to apologize to all Muslims, and Morsy has to take steps and expel the American ambassador.”
In the film “Innocence of Muslims,” the prophet is depicted as a gay, wine drinking fraud. Riots broke out early Wednesday evening and have been on-going ever since. Earlier, on Tuesday, protesters demonstrated in front of the US Embassy in Cairo and replaced the American flag with one bearing the Islamic declaration of faith.
“We are constantly under attack”
Many felt outraged over what they believe to be a selective censorship policy in the US and Europe. One man claimed that Bill Clinton had once banned a film deemed offensive to Christianity, although Egypt Independent has been able to find no record of such an incident.
A number of protesters Egypt Independent spoke to made references to the Danish cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohamed, which in 2005 sparked protests in many countries across the Islamic world.
“I feel insulted by the US and by Europe, because we are constantly under attack by them. If they made a similar movie about Jews, the makers would have been arrested. But because we are Muslims, they get away with this,” says 19-year-old Mostafa Amer. Amer said he saw the movie and felt compelled to take to the streets because, like many, he feels the steps taken by president Morsy are not enough.
He adds that they could not do this at the time of the Danish cartoons, because the country was still under the rule of former President Hosni Mubarak.
“It's very disturbing that the security forces are still being used against us, and to protect them [the embassy]. The Interior Ministry hasn't changed with Morsy, but the time of silence is now over,” he says.
Earlier on Thursday, Morsy tasked the Egyptian embassy in the US with taking legal steps against the makers of the film, and condemned “whoever tries to abuse or exercise abuse of any kind against our Prophet or any of the Islamic holy sites.” In addition, Morsy pledged to protect the US embassy.
“Where is the prophet's right?”
From protesters' accounts, one could tell that the Prophet, the subject matter of the film, plays a central role in the make-up of their identity, infringement upon which is perceived as a violation of their basic rights. In addition, many placed the film in the context of decades of injustice they feel was inflicted upon them by Western governments, only adding to the deep sense of injustice felt by many.
Khalil Abdel Khaliq, a 46-year-old shop owner, said he was here to fight for “the Prophet's right, thus my right and that of all Muslims.” He emphasized his opposition to the violence around him, but felt compelled to be present because, “if we accept being stepped upon like this, we will be stepped upon a thousand times more. Who will be the next one stepping on us?”
Abdel Khaliq had not seen the film, but believes that it amounts to an insult to him and the “entire Muslim world” on the basis of his friends' accounts of it. “I am here out of love for the Prophet, and as a Muslim,” he said.
These types of sentiments combined with a long-standing fury directed towards the Interior Ministry has proven to be a sufficient formula for clashes lasting more than a day, with only seconds-long interruptions after each call to prayer from the Omar Makram Mosque, the scene of the clashes.
Adding fuel to the confrontations is the Interior Ministry's perceived failure thus far to recover its authority and esteem, previously contingent on a fear that is apparently no longer present in ever more emboldened protesters. Proof of this is the burning of at least four police vehicles during these clashes, one of them defiantly pushed in the direction of the security forces, only 5 meters away from the police frontline.
As the Maghreb prayer was still resounding from the mosque's speakers, a dozen tear-gas canisters filled the sky, and armored vehicles chased protesters who ran in the direction of Tahrir Square.
The Muslim Brotherhood has called for peaceful protests outside mosques across the country, scheduled for later today.


Clic here to read the story from its source.