Top notch defence for policeman    Support Egypt sweeps parliamentary committees    Sinai: A new focus    4G enabled    FDI galore?    The battle for Mosul    Iran's role in Mosul    Desperate times for tourism    Better with age    Early handshake    Silver splash    CINEMA    Religious anonymity    Café de Paris butter stuffed breaded chicken    THEATRE    Cry my beloved language    The fall of ‘Nobel'    Yemen ceasefire takes effect after day of violence    Power minister submits report to Sisi on Dabaa nuclear plant talks    Egypt opens Rafah crossing with Gaza for second day    US presidential debate: Trump won't commit to accept poll result    Hollande pledges to push ceasefire extension at Syria talks with Putin, Merkel    Death sentences in Kerdasa police station case revoked    Euro on defensive before ECB; Mexican peso firms to 6-week high after US debate    Oil prices drop after strong rally, but sentiment remains confident    Egypt and world oil prices    Parliament names illegal immigrants as victims not defendants    Armed Forces kills 19 militants, demolishes 31 stationing points in Sinai    Egypt's Parliament officially approves Illegal Immigration Law    Egypt, Japan to sign two financing deals in final week of October    Egyptian activist Haitham Mohamedain released    Prominent Egyptian poet Farouq Shousha dies at 80    Bob Dylan wins Nobel Literature Prize first time for songwriter    Serena Williams speaks out against police killings: 'I won't be silent'    Supercar maker McLaren says not in talks with Apple    Sherif Osman Secures Egypt's First Gold Medal at Rio Paralympic Games    تغريدة - هكذا كانت تهنئة نجوم وفرق العالم للمسلمين بعيد الأضحى    صورة- ذا روك يعلن عن بطلة فيلمه الجديد Jumanji 2    Court sentences Geneina to 1 year in prison    Egypt will always remain an oasis of security: Sisi    Egyptian Exchange gains EGP 2 billion on Thursday    Obama Passes Torch to Clinton, Slams Trump    Egypt in the international media    Azhar rejects Egypt govt decision to standardise Friday sermons    British delegation agreed MB designation as a terrorist group, MPs    Egypt in the international media    Egyptian Lebanese House to release Shahawy's new book next month    Antiquities Min. to extend Archaeological Transcripts& Books Fair    

Thank you for reporting!
This image will be automatically disabled when it gets reported by several people.

Not a drop to drink
Published in Al-Ahram Weekly on 30 - 08 - 2012

An unprecedented shortage in the supply of bottled water leaves the market thirsty, Nesma Nowar reports
Bottled water is a scarce commodity in Egypt these days. Supermarket racks are empty of bottled water and customers often have to visit more than five places in the hope to getting one bottle of water.
��No bottled water" is repeatedly heard by customers entering supermarkets.
The shortage started during the fasting month of Ramadan, but has since escalated. In addition to scarcity, bottled water now costs as much as 40 per cent more than its pre-shortage price. A box of bottled water could now reach LE40 compared to LE23 before Ramadan.
One owner of a supermarket in Cairo's Mohandessin neighbourhood, attributed the shortage in supply to the closure of seven mineral water companies on grounds that they did not meet health and safety standards.
He said that shutting down these companies affected the supply of bottled water in the market and that the remaining companies could not cope with the increased market demand.
��I cannot order any quantity of water now," the owner told Al-Ahram Weekly. "I only can get a maximum of 10 boxes."
As for prices hikes, the shop owner stated that water companies did not increase their prices. Rather, wholesale traders have taken advantage of the shortage to raise prices.
Several supermarkets visited by the Weekly attributed the shortage to the same reason. Ahmed Ali, owner of a kiosk in the Dokki district, said that he did not buy any new bottled water since the end of Ramadan because of its increased price. "I refuse to buy the bottled water at LE32 per box as in this case I would have to increase the sales price."
In June, the Egyptian Ministry of Health shut down seven mineral water companies out of a total of 15 operating�ê�.�ê� The companies were closed after test results from random samples of groundwater wells used by the companies showed they contain water pollutants, including live protozoa.
That is not the only factor behind the current crisis, according to Ahmed Yehia, head of the foodstuffs division at the Cairo Chamber of Commerce.
Yehia said that an increased consumption of bottled water this summer has compounded the problem. He stated that the extraordinarily hot summer prompted people to drink more water, which in turn increased consumption.
Moreover, he said, bottled water consumption normally peaks at this time of the year, where it coincides with summer holidays. "That is why the shortage is more evident in coastal cities where many Egyptians go to escape the summer heat."
Yehia also blamed recurrent power cuts during summer for the crisis. He explained that power outages resulted in interruptions in the supply of water to various buildings, especially the high-rise buildings. This in turn added to bottled water consumption. "Increased demand accompanied by a decline in supply has led to the current crisis," Yehia told the Weekly.
Yehia affirmed that mineral water companies did not increase prices, with the exception of one company that raised prices 20 per cent. He added that other prices hikes could occur during trade cycles through wholesale or retail sellers. "At the end of the day, bottled water is a commodity that is subject to supply and demand."
Yehia underlined that Egypt's production of bottled water is sufficient for local consumption and the present shortage is "unprecedented" and due to increased demand.
The biggest victim of this shortage has been the tourism sector. Board member of the Egyptian Hotel Association, Haitham Nassar, said that the crisis has negatively affected hotels, especially those in tourist areas, as demand in these areas is high.
He said that hotels that had contracts with any of the seven companies that were shut down suffered the most. "These hotels are witnessing problems in bottled water supply and probably would see price hikes."
Meanwhile, Nassar affirmed that the situation could have been much worse had occupancy rates in hotels reached pre-revolution levels. He explained that the downturn in the tourism sector persists and that occupancy levels remain low.
Yehia expects the crisis to be over within a month when the summer season comes to an end, temperatures decrease, and power cuts -- the result of shortages in capacity in part driven by the strains of the summer heat -- become less frequent.

Clic here to read the story from its source.